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New public notices published in the issue of Jan. 8, 2021

BOARD MINUTESBOARD OF WRIGHT COUNTY COMMISSIONERS DECEMBER 1, 2020 DATE APPROVED: December 15, 2020
The Wright County Board met in regular session at 9:00 A.M. with Husom, Vetsch, Potter and Daleiden present. Borrell attended remotely.
COUNTY BOARD MINUTES 11-24-20
Vetsch moved to approve the 11-24-20 Wright County Board minutes. The motion was seconded by Daleiden and carried 5-0.
AGENDA
* Borrell petitioned to the agenda discussion of an emergency repair needed on County Ditch #38. It was placed on the Agenda as Timed Item D.
Daleiden moved to accept the agenda as amended. The motion was seconded by Borrell and carried 5-0.
CONSENT AGENDA
County Administrator Lee Kelly asked for a change to Item B under Administration. The date of the County Board Workshop was changed from December 15, 2020 to December 8, 2020.
Daleiden moved to approve the Consent Agenda as amended. The motion was seconded by Borrell and carried 5-0.
A. AUDITOR-TREASURER
1. Acknowledge Warrants Issued Between November 18, 2020 And November 23, 2020
2. Approve Renewal of 2021 Tobacco Licenses for the Following: City of Albertville: Cardinal Enterprises, LLC, DBA Speedway #4849; Corinna Township: Two Friends of Annandale Inc. DBA Hitching Post at Lake Center; City of Clearwater: Mark Allen Campbell DBA Brothers Smoke & More; City of Cokato: DG Retail LLC, DBA Dollar General Store #10460; City of Delano: City of Delano DBA Delano Wine & Spirits; City of Maple Lake: DG Retail LLC, DBA Dollar General Store #15392; City of Montrose: DG Retail LLC, DBA Dollar General Store #16105; City of Rockford: Cardinal Enterprises LLC, DBA Speedway #4834; DG Retail LLC, DBA Dollar General Store #18158.
3. Motion to Approve the Reimbursements of the CARES Act Funds as Recommended by the Wright County CARES Committee to Close Out the Grant. All Grants Will Be Accounted for by the December 1, 2020 Deadline.
Request Denial of the Pay Request from Wright County Community Action (WCCA) Due to Lack of Time and the Passing of the October 30, 2020 Deadline
B. ADMINISTRATION
1. Refer the Following Items to the December 8, 2020 County Board Workshop
A. Architectural and Planning Services for Dental Clinic
B. Commissioners Handbook
C. CHIPS Contract (Cathy Gabriel)
C. HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES
1. Position Replacement
A. Lead Eligibility Specialist
TIMED AGENDA ITEMS
BOB HIIVALA, AUDITOR/TREASURER
Discuss Authorization for Purchase of Elections Equipment
Discussion had been laid over from the November 24, 2020 County Board meeting to gather more information on the potential purchase of 26 OmniBallot assisted voting technology devices. Hiivala recommended buying just one OmniBallot machine due to concerns about its sustainability and news that the Automark voting systems, which is the technology Wright County Elections uses, will continue to be supported by Windows and will be able to be used for several more election cycles. One unique feature to the OmniBallot product is its capability to print additional ballots in the event there is a shortage and more ballots are required. Daleiden asked if the county has options in looking to the future of voting technology. Hiivala said that, short of scrapping everything the county currently has, most counties are tied into the assisted voting technology vendors they are currently with, so options are minimal. Husom said there was no reason to complete the grant and purchase 26 OmniBallot devices given the unproven track record from those who have used the product and that the county would be required to match the grant funds. Hiivala added that his choice would be ExpressVote technology because it used in all surrounding states and has performed well, including in a Presidential recount in Wisconsin in November. However, Minnesota currently doesn’t allow counties to choose which assisted voter technology they wish to have for their residents. Potter stated that the budgets for elections remain steady for both election and non-election years so that there isn’t a consistent levy spike in election years and having budget funds available allows for purchases like the one being presented by Hiivala.
Daleiden moved to authorize the purchase of one OmniBallot assisted voting technology device and return unused grant funds to the State of Minnesota. The motion was seconded by Potter and carried 5-0.
ALICIA O’HARE, WRIGHT SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION DISTRICT
Approve Wright County Soil and Water Conservation District to Oversee Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) Prevention Aid
O’Hare said this an annual housekeeping item, obtaining a resolution from the County Board to access Aquatic Invasive Species Prevention Aid funding from the State of Minnesota and transfer those funds to the Wright Soil & Water Conservation District for implementation of its AIS activities. In 2021, Wright County will receive $227,513 in AIS funding, essentially the same amount received in 2020.
Daleiden moved to adopt the resolution to allow the Wright Soil & Water Conservation District to oversee the distribution of Aquatic Invasive Species Prevention Aid funding for 2021. The motion was seconded by Borrell and carried 5-0
ADMINISTRATION/WRIGHT COUNTY EMERGING LEADERS
Wright County Emerging Leaders – Season of Giving Summary
Wright County employees Kara Kampa, Erin Baker and Jessica Gadach presented the results of the charitable efforts of Wright County Emerging Leaders, a collection of 18 county employees from different departments throughout the organization that devised and implemented a charitable campaign from late-October to the week before Thanksgiving. The program, called Season of Giving, sought to collect baking supplies for needy families and deliver them to the 10 food shelves in Wright County. Kampa said county employees and residents collected more than 1,500 items for delivery to the food shelves. Baker said for an initiative that was completed in a very short time period, the generosity of county employees and residents was amazing. Kampa said many people donated directly to the food shelves, which increased the numbers even more. Husom and Daleiden commended the Wright County Emerging Leaders for the efforts and their willingness to assist residents in need in Wright County.
No board action was taken as the item was informational
* MATTHEW DETJEN, AG & DRAINAGE
Request for Emergency Repair to County Ditch # 38
Borrell said the repair on Ditch #38 is located alongside Hwy 12 between Waverly and Montrose. He said the tile is obstructed and needs to be replaced. Borrell said this was first time since he’s been on the County Board that the flow of water has been as low as it is now, making it an ideal time to make this repair. Detjen said Ditch #38 has always been a problem because of its location, antiquated tile system and that it runs under a Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) railroad bed. He said there is a realignment plan in place for Ditch #38 in the future, but this 860-foot repair is necessary now because of the obstructions and collapsed tile. Daleiden said he has toured the ditch several times as a County Commissioner and said the ditch is “a disaster.” Detjen said the preliminary cost estimate for the repair was $19,635, but added that tile prices have risen 6 percent over the last month due to demand and the cost could go slightly higher.
Borrell moved to approve up to $20,000 for the emergency repair to County Ditch #38. The motion was seconded by Potter and carried 5-0.
ITEMS FOR CONSIDERATION
ADMINISTRATION
Approve Resolution and Letter of Support Xcel Energy Upper Midwest Energy Plan
Kelly said that Xcel Energy is working through channels to get approval of its Upper Midwest Energy Plan (UMEP). He said Xcel has been a good community partner in Wright County and the company is looking for support from local government units to endorse its UMEP. To that end, Kelly drafted a resolution and letter of support for the County Board’s consideration. Vetsch said that part of the UMEP is extending the life of the Monticello Nuclear Power Plant, which is of vital importance to the county because it is the largest property tax generator in Wright County. He added that the support is needed because Xcel will be seeking approval of the UMEP from the Public Utilities Commission in 2021. Vetsch said Xcel’s goal is to be 80 percent carbon-free by 2030 and 100 percent carbon-free by 2050. Much of the UMEP is contingent on having the nuclear plant as a major component of the project, which includes natural gas, solar and wind-powered energy.
Vetsch moved to approve the resolution and letter of support of Xcel Energy’s Upper Midwest Energy Plan. The motion was seconded by Potter and carried 5-0.
11-13-20 DITCH COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE MINUTES
At today’s meeting, Potter moved to accept the 11-13-20 Ditch Committee of the Whole minutes with the addition of including a recommendation to remove the fee charged to the County by the firm of Rinke-Noonan from the benefitted landowner rolls for ditch assessments. The motion was seconded by Daleiden and carried 5-0.
Committee of the Whole regarding annual ditch assessments
Edmonson listed the current annual charges that are being allocated to all ditch systems by the number of miles per system:
1. Rinke-Noonan retainer fee which is $2,400.00 per year or $200.00 monthly
2. Houston Engineering drainage/DB annual maintenance fee at $4,000.00
3. 25 percent of the Drainage Coordinator’s salary plus benefits
Vetsch stated that Rinke Noonan is for the County’s legal protection and should not be charged back to the ditch systems. The landowners should not be charged for the County’s legal defense. Husom thought that it could become a legal issue if the landowners questioned as to why they were paying the retainer fee. Kryzer felt that it is a valid assessment that can be made against all the ditch systems. Seeking outside council for certain items is very appropriate. The County is protecting the entire ditch system when requesting outside council from an expert in drainage law. Multiple times landowners have tried things that are against the law. It is a valid expense, however if the board chooses not to charge the landowners for the retainer, that is something the board can decide. Daleiden disagreed in that, the only reason we have Rinke Noonan on retainer is because of the County Ditches and thus justifies allocating the expense to all the systems. Borrell stated that it is a legitimate expense and pointed out that there are so many other expenditures that other counties charge the ditch systems that Wright County has never done.
Kryzer added that there are times when Rinke Noonan does legal work on a specific ditch system and those fees are charged back to that system. The retainer fee is spread across all systems according to the number of miles on each system.
Vetsch felt the only way the County could justify the allocations were if the Drainage Coordinator tracked all his hours by system. Detjen added that starting in 2021 Cody Lehn will be the ditch inspector and will track his hours by ditch system.
Detjen felt that the larger systems that have more than one year of administrative fees assessed and have had no work done on them, are where the landowners get the most upset. Those systems may only need minor repairs and are not interested in doing a redetermination of benefits. Vetsch felt that there are several systems that are paying administrative fees that have not had any work done on them in years and it is difficult to justify the assessment. Potter thought that maybe splitting the assessment costs between the County and the landowners would be a possibility.
Husom thought that the retainer for Rinke Noonan could be charged to Professional Services. Kryzer added that it is entirely up to the board as how they want to proceed with how the retainer will be expensed. Kryzer thought the board could increase the legal fees line item in the budget for the Attorney’s office and have the payments to Rinke Noonan paid from the Attorney’s expense account.
After further discussion it was decided by the board that legal fees would be paid by the Attorney’s office and drainage/DB and a percentage of the Drainage Coordinator’s salary would be allocated to each ditch system according to the total miles of the system.
There was discussion regarding the level of approvals regarding the ditch expenditures on a system. Kryzer stated that currently expenditures over fifteen thousand must be approved by the board. If the repairs meet the threshold of requiring bids, those are obtained. If the repairs are over one hundred and seventy-five thousand, then a public hearing is required.
After further discussion it was decided by the board to leave the approval levels and authorizations per the current policy. Detjen stated one of his future projects is to create a means of where landowners can furnish their Email contact information which will enable them to receive notices of repairs or maintenance on a system and other notices regarding ditches. This would also give landowners more visibility to future assessments to prepare for financially.
Edmonson requested direction from the drainage authority going forward. The administrative fees were not assessed in 2020 according to the board approval to eliminate them from the assessments, during the board meeting on October 20, 2020. Kryzer stated he would prepare a resolution from today’s meeting clarifying the direction the Auditor’s office would take in the future.
RECOMMENDATION: Remove Rinke-Noonan from the formula for determining assessments charged back to benefitted landowners along the County’s ditch system. Rinke-Noonan’s retainer fee will be taken out of the Professional Services line item of the County’s budget.
11-24-20 COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE MEETING
At today’s County Board meeting, Vetsch moved to approve the 11-24-20 Committee of the Whole minutes and recommendations. The motion was seconded by Daleiden and carried 5-0.
I. Auditor/Treasurer & Finance
Husom explained that the process of arriving at this meeting began when the County Board opted to implement a strategic planning effort in March. The goal was to create efficiencies in various departments and, during that process, Hiivala reached out to Vetsch and Husom and discussions began of how to make the Auditor/Treasurer’s Office (ATO) more streamlined. Over the years, several sub-departments were put under the umbrella of the ATO. For some time, Wright County had looked at hiring a Finance Director to focus the work done in the ATO into two divisions.
Vetsch said the discussion has arisen because of the size of Wright County. He said that, in the last two years since the State Legislature allowed counties to convert from an elected Auditor/Treasurer to an appointed position without stand-alone requests for legislation, eight counties in Minnesota have done so. Currently, about half of Minnesota’s 87 counties have appointed Auditor/Treasurers, including all nine counties larger than Wright County.
Hiivala said every year when his salary is discussed, the word “comparables” would come up. The conversations began as to why Wright County wasn’t comparable to those counties of larger size. Vetsch said that, in the strategic planning process, there were candid conversations with department heads in hopes of identifying opportunities for improvement and accelerating some decisions that needed to be made. Husom said that, under the current system, there are too many functions contained within the ATO.
Those functions included the core Finance component in accounts payable, accounts receivable, payroll, investments, auditing functions and grant reporting. But, the Wright County ATO was also responsible for land records, elections, property tax assessments, ditch records, passports, tobacco/liquor and other licenses, cemeteries and the License Bureau.
Vetsch said the conclusions that were drawn included identifying the need for more robust financial functions, continuity of operations across election cycles, adding depth of staff financial functions, position for sustained growth to meet the needs of a growth county, advancing technology, adapting to reporting requirements and managing staff within the ATO’s sub-divisions.
The recommended steps moving forward were to optimize departmental efficiencies, look into transitioning the position of Auditor/Treasurer from an elected to an appointed position and to realign the financial duties of the ATO into its own entity within the department.
Vetsch cited Minnesota Statute 375A.1205 that deals with the transition of the Auditor/Treasurer position. The process would require agreement between the Auditor/Treasurer and the County Board, a contract to be drawn, public notice be given and the completion of the current elected term of the Auditor/Treasurer. If those four components were met, the position could transform from elected to appointed, with the Auditor/Treasurer reporting directly to the County Board. Under the realignment, while the Auditor/Treasurer would report to the County Board, the Finance Division would become a division under Administration with the Finance Director assuming supervision over that division.
Hiivala said the conversations with board had been about how to best serve the residents of Wright County and having employees assigned to do what they do best in the day-to-day operation. Hiivala said he agreed with the County Board’s position.
Under the delineation of duties, the Auditor/Treasurer would be responsible for financial auditing, financial forecasting, monitoring current and future projects in the Capital Improvement Projects fund, managing the fund balance and overseeing debt management. The Finance Director was assume responsibility over supervising the financial staff, accounts receivable, accounts payable, payroll, employee expense reimbursement, billing, disbursements, general ledger, account reconciliation, monitoring spending and cash flow, coordinating the county budget, financial and process training among county departments, preparing comprehensive annual financial statements, reviewing contracts, document and contract retention and licensing.
A flow chart was developed as to how the new Finance Division would lay out. The Finance Division would become an arm of Administration. There would be two wings of the Finance Division – the finance and reporting wing and one that would include property tax administration and Citizens Services (DMV and Elections).
In the new Government Center, the current ATO will be adjusted. The Auditor/Treasurer will be on the First Floor in the Commissioners area, the Finance Division will be on the Third Floor in Administration, the License Bureau will be in its own area on the First Floor, tax functions will take place in the ATO on the First Floor and land records will be shifted to the Recorder’s area on the First Floor.
Husom said the division would play to Hiivala’s strengths and that it would be a win-win situation for the county and its residents. Hiivala said that by keeping the Auditor/Treasurer a core function that reports to the County Board and not Administration, it retains the independence of the position. He felt it was important to make that distinction and retain that independence. Vetsch stated the Auditor/Treasurer should work at the will of the County Board as to not have be in alignment with any county departments. Hiivala said that, in its current state, the ATO is responsible for many duties, but the master of none of them.
Potter said the division of the ATO would provide a level of checks and balances for the betterment of Wright County residents and that this division is a natural progression given the size of the county and the need to make this transition. He stated his concern that, given the growth of Wright County, an Auditor/Treasurer candidate could potentially be elected and be unqualified for the job.
Hiivala said he has prided himself on being a watchdog of the county budgets – the County Board sets the budgets, but it is his job to hold departments to those budgetary limits. In his refined position, he would still be doing that. He acknowledged that the ATO office has evolved and the demands of other county departments has grown. Hiivala added that, through the strategic planning initiative, he can focus more of his time on the meaningful project the County Board has to deal with as opposed to the day-to-day operations.
Vetsch said that, with the current ATO staff, there will be some work flow changes and that, at the moment, the change is conceptual and won’t be immediately activated. It is simply the direction that the ATO is heading. Husom said that there are procedural steps that need to be taken to complete the process. County Administrator Lee Kelly stated that there is a procedure that needs to be followed under state statutes for posting the intentions of the County Board that require posting in the official county newspaper for two weeks to allow for public comment. Kelly suggested the matter be placed on the December 15, 2020 agenda for discussion and a vote. Potter said that the division of the ATO will maximize efficiencies and be in the best interests of the taxpayers of Wright County. Kelly stated this is one of the first steps of what will be ongoing discussions regarding strategic planning.
RECOMMENDATIONS
1. Pursuant to Minnesota Statute 375A.1205, begin the process of converting the Auditor/Treasurer position from an elected position to an appointed position. As part of the process, the proposed change will be posted in the official county newspaper to provide for a 14-day comment period.
2. Place discussion of the changeover of the Auditor/Treasurer position on the December 15, 2020 Wright County Board agenda for Board action.
3. Begin discussions with members within the Auditor/Treasurer’s Office to create new alignments for placement of the new Finance Director/Finance Department and begin the transfer around the new organizational structure for Financial Services.
11-25-20 TECHNOLOGY COMMITTEE MINUTES
At today’s County Board meeting, discussion took place about issues with the Zuercher software. Vetsch said that when the County enters into agreements to purchase multi-million-dollar pieces of software, there should be the requirement for continuity of service agreements for the life span of the software because so many smaller software companies are being sold to larger corporations. He hopes to see future contracts to include continuity of service language. Daleiden said the Wright County Attorney’s Office has drafted a letter to send to the company because it currently is not supporting the contract that was signed between Wright County and Zuercher.
Daleiden moved to approve the Technology Committee minutes. The motion was seconded by Vetsch and carried 5-0.
I. ECM Architect & O365 Architect
Matthew Fomby, IT Director, informed the Committee that ConnieMae Cooper, former IT Business Analyst, is now the ECM (Enterprise Content Management) Architect. This role will work heavily with the County’s OnBase and SharePoint platforms and their content management capabilities. Andrea Benedict, former IT Business Analyst, is now the O365 (Microsoft Office 365) Architect. This role will involve O365 enhancements, implementation, and training of O365 products. Cooper & Benedict will be point on these platforms, departments are directed to reach out to them on the products, they will also be doing their own outreach. The positions that were vacated are currently in the HR (Human Resources) process.
RECOMMENDATION: Informational Only
II. Project Updates
Andrea Benedict, IT O365 Architect, summarized the SharePoint 2019 upgrade project. The IT Team is working on the best transition to a split environment of Cloud and on-premise access and storage. Christine Partlow, HHS Business Manager, asked for clarification on the project summary O365 components of InTune and Teams rollouts. Becki Murphy, IT Application Portfolio Analyst, will gather more information from the IT Team on InTune progress. Murphy stated that Sr. Systems Engineer Josh Fox is working on the configuration and compliance areas for the rest of the Teams rollout. Fomby added that there is a lot of backend happenings with Teams itself, with the County just utilizing a portion of it right now.
Andrea Benedict noted that the iSeries project, which allows for a hosted backup of crucial data, will be transitioned to the vendor in December. Prep work continues to move forward to work on a successful crossover.
Andrea Benedict also touched on the CAMA project. Departments continue to engage in prep work for this highly anticipated project.
The Administration Event Scheduler was brought up by IT BA, Kevin Kaszynski. Kaszynski noted several departments have different thoughts on what their needs are, which may result in the County having several different solutions. Much discussion revolved around this idea of several solutions. Commissioner Mark Daleiden focused on the fact that he wants to be diligent about the use of taxpayer dollars, not wanting to see several high-dollar solutions bought, when one solution will work for 90 percent of needs. Mike MacMillan, Court Services Department Head, made clear that department needs are indeed different. Commissioner Darek Vetsch added that there should always be ways for us to explore pilot projects in regards to finding which option to pursue. Fomby added that IT will continue to investigate different products to find the best ones. Jim O’Dell, HHS (Health & Human Services), stressed that although HHS will be a big user of the product, they don’t want to dictate the product that is picked. HHS wants to see the best product that works for everyone. Kaszynski will continue to review products and vendors, scheduling demos as needed, options will be presented to the Committee. Partlow, questioned if there will be interactive display monitors that will integrate with a scheduling system in the New Government Center (GC). MacMillan directed that staff should speak with Monica Tschumper with the State Courts system to see what they are utilizing in the new Justice Center. Fomby, directed that he will have Frank Petitta, IT Audio Visual Technician relay what plans are for the new GC.
The Health & Human Services (HHS) Contact Management Center, previously referred to as Call Center, was updated by Kevin Kaszynski. A lot of work is being done on this project with HHS providing a lot of focus and energy to bring it to completion. The Design Phase is currently being worked on with HHS and the Vendor, which is going well. Server discussions are being worked out to determine the right solution with the Vendor & the County, the IT Team is actively involved with this. The project is moving along nicely.
The Enterprise Resource Planning Project (ERP) was reviewed by Lee Kelly, County Administrator. Kelly noted that the recent recalibration of the project into work streams is proving to be fruitful. Financial Management and Procurement are seeing a lot of work and progress being made. Procurement will focus on catalogs next. Budgeting will be clarified in an upcoming session. HCM, the HR piece, is going slower but focus is being made on security issues. Change Management continues with recent Demos being helpful for many involved.
RECOMMENDATION: Informational Only
III. New Project Requests
Rebecca Murphy, IT, noted there were no new project requests at this time. RECOMMENDATION: Informational Only IV. Project Portfolio Summary Rebecca Murphy, reviewed the Project Portfolio. She highlighted recent updates to the project site that will provide more transparency. Projects of a number 1 priority are all actively being worked on. A brief review of other projects was done with the Sheriff’s CAD project being discussed more in-depth. Shawna Athman, Sheriff Office Administrator lead the overview of the Zuercher situation. The product vendor is not providing expected support, after consultation with the Attorney’s Office it was determined that an alternative product launch date should have a goal of 2022. Commissioner Daleiden questioned the process that will be gone through for the product selection to ensure we don’t make a repeat of the situation we are in now. Athman responded that a consultant (different from the Zuercher one) will be brought in to assist in selection. There was also discussion that one of the original vendors, Tyler, was more expensive which is why the County didn’t go with them. Cost, Quality, and Company standing will be researched in depth in the process. She also noted that Sheriff Operations Captain Todd Hoffmann kept the original RFI documentation which will help greatly with crafting an updated one. Murphy will work with the Sheriff’s Office to move this project to correct standing within the Portfolio.
RECOMMENDATION: Informational Only
ADVISORY COMMITTEE/ADVISORY BOAD UPDATES
Midwest Regional Forensics Laboratory. Husom attended virtually on Wednesday, November 25, 2020 along with Wright County Sheriff Sean Deringer. They received an update on staffing at the lab and training procedures. The case work has been down 6.5 percent overall in 2020, but witnessed a significant increase in biological analysis in August, October and November. The next meeting of the Committee is tentatively scheduled to be in-person in March 2021 in Wright County.
Tax Rate. Potter said he met with Auditor/Treasurer’s office staff to get a 20-year overview of Wright County’s tax rate. He said the current County Board hasn’t been wildly spending as was speculated during county commissioner elections and that the county’s tax rate confirms that. Husom said that, if your property value remained that same in 2020 as 2019, the amount of taxes paid has actually gone down. Potter said Wright County was 66th out of 87 counties in Minnesota in 2019 in per capita spending, despite being the 10th largest county is the state.
Route Fifty. Daleiden reported on a newsletter article by Route Fifty, an organization that connects state and local government leaders. He referenced the 25th year of the thinktank Reason Foundation’s study of road quality and effectiveness of state-controlled highways in all 50 states – ranking them from top to bottom. In 2015, Minnesota ranked 25th in the metrics used. That increased to 15th in 2018, the most recent year of data collection. Daleiden thanked Potter for all the work he did in his eight years as commissioner dealing with transportation issues on behalf of the citizens of Wright County.
Truth in Taxation. Kelly reminded residents that the annual budget/certified levy would be held at 6 p.m. Tuesday, December 1, 2020, adding that the meeting will be live-streamed on the Wright County YouTube channel.
The meeting adjourned at 9:59 a.m.
County Board Minutes submitted by John Holler, Communication Specialist
WARRANTS FOR PUBLICATIONWarrants Approved On 11/18/2020 For Payment 11/18/2020
CENTERPOINT ENERGY 2,731.57
CENTRAL MN MENTAL HEALTH CENTER INC 15,016.54
CLEARWATER TOWNSHIP 6,538.21
CORINNA TOWNSHIP 34,930.22
DASSEL COKATO ISD 466 79,753.21
DELANO LORETTO AREA UNITED WAY 2,492.91
JON ANSTETT GYMNASTICS INC 20,000.00
LASER ETCH TECHNOLOGIES LLC 20,000.00
MEEKER & WRIGHT SPECIAL EDUCATION COOP 19,256.84
RIDGEVIEW MEDICAL CENTER 18,470.00
RMM SANDWICHES LLC 20,000.00
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 2687 128,660.86
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 877 819,944.00
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 882 167,614.60
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 883 12,299.15
SOAR REGIONAL ARTS 7,000.00
WRIGHT COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION 24,987.50
ZIEGLER INC 12,743.00
36 Payments less than 2000 10,540.83
Final Total: 1,422,979.44
Warrants Approved On 11/20/2020 For Payment 11/20/2020
ASSOCIATED BANK 906,762.50
BOND TRUST SERVICES CORPORATION 6,398,113.13
Final Total: 7,304,875.63
Warrants Approved On 11/20/2020 For Payment 11/20/2020
AAA STRIPING SERVICE INC 11,882.00
ASSETWORKS LLC 24,165.96
AVTEX SOLUTIONS LLC 223,191.60
BIOTANICA LLC 11,750.00
COMPASS MINERALS AMERICA INC 7,257.06
MINNESOTA PAVING & MATERIALS 3,452.74
MOONEN/DANIEL K 15,400.00
MSC INDUSTRIAL SUPPLY CO 3,731.32
RCM SPECIALTIES INC 2,674.77
RIVERWORKS 20,000.00
SRF CONSULTING GROUP INC 2,797.33
SUBURBAN TIRE WHOLESALE INC 3,284.85
TOWMASTER 17,159.13
WRIGHT CTY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PARTNER 150,000.00
WSB & ASSOCIATES INC 76,562.17
ZIEGLER INC 12,743.00
24 Payments less than 2000 10,047.03
Final Total: 596,098.96
Warrants Approved For Payment 11/23/2020
US BANK VOYAGER FLEET SYSTEMS 14,941.61
Final Total: 14,941.61
Warrants Approved On 11/23/2020 For Payment 11/23/2020
ANOKA COUNTY CORRECTIONS 30,614.20
ARAMARK SERVICES INC 23,426.04
AT&T MOBILITY 3,017.72
AXON ENTERPRISES INC 12,128.55
CIVICPLUS 12,895.76
DELL MARKETING LP 8,444.17
EHLERS AND ASSOCIATES 3,800.00
GRANITE ELECTRONICS 2,150.10
GUARDIAN FLEET SAFETY LLC 3,306.55
INSIDE OUTSIDE ARCHITECTURE, INC. 4,095.75
MARTIN-MCALLISTER CONSULTING 2,750.00
NETWRIX CORPORATION 7,960.00
OLSON & SONS ELECTRIC 20,088.86
OMNICARE INC 2,179.80
PATNODE BROTHERS INC 21,486.00
SEACHANGE PRINTING AND MARKETING LLC 21,713.04
TRUE NORTH CONSULTING GROUP, LLC 6,708.00
TW VENDING INC 10,237.83
60 Payments less than 2000 27,205.95
Final Total: 224,208.32
Warrants Approved For Payment 11/23/2020
US BANK-PROCUREMENT CARDS 67,430.76
Final Total: 67,430.76
Warrants Approved On 11/23/2020 For Payment 11/23/2020
HEALTH PARTNERS 788,202.72
HEALTH PARTNERS - DENTAL 23,510.31
Final Total: 811,713.03
Published in the Herald Journal, Jan. 8, 2021.
BOARD MINUTES BOARD OF WRIGHT COUNTY COMMISSIONERS DECEMBER 1, 2020 (PM) DATE APPROVED: December 15, 2020
The Wright County Board met in special session at 6:00 p.m. with Husom, Daleiden, Potter and Vetsch present. Borrell attended remotely.
ANNUAL BUDGET/CERTIFIED LEVY PUBLIC HEARING
Husom welcomed those in attendance to the meeting, which is commonly referred to as the annual Truth in Taxation hearing. The County Commissioners introduced themselves and stated what cities and townships they represent in their commissioner districts. Husom introduced members of the Auditor/Treasurer’s Office in attendance – Bob Hiivala, Ryan Kotila and Heather Lemieux – as well as Christine Partlow from Health & Human Services and Sheriff Sean Deringer in the event there were resident questions for which any of them could provide answers. Husom stated that typically staff from the Assessor’s Office would be in attendance to respond to questions dealing with property valuations or classifications, but, due to COVID-19 restrictions, a sign-up sheet was provided to schedule times for those who wished to speak with the Assessor’s Office the following day (Wednesday, December 2, 2020).
County Administrator Lee Kelly narrated a PowerPoint presentation prepared by the Auditor/Treasurer’s Office. In included discussing the timeline for the budget process, a statutory timeline for property taxes, how tax dollars are spent at the county level, laying out the per capita costs for roads and bridges ($3.70 a month), parks and trails ($1.49 a month), Sheriff/911 dispatch ($15.73 per month) and libraries ($1.29 per month). Kelly also summarized how the county used its allocation from the CARES Act, which included giving $4.2 million to school districts and $2.8 million to small businesses and non-profit/affiliate groups (118 small businesses and 39 non-profit/affiliates). He highlighted projects that are ongoing and completed. Current projects include the new Wright County Government Center and the expansion of the Trailblazer Transit facility. Projects completed in 2020 include the Justice Center, which opened in October and the Wright County Sheriff’s Office Training Center, which opened in May.
Kelly presented the 2021 budget and levy. The proposed 2021 budget is $153,827,373 with a 2021 draft certified levy of $82,513,432 – which represents a 5.0 percent increase from 2020. The tax capacity growth in Wright County in 2020, which represents new construction, was 6.99 percent. Kelly pointed out that the levy percentage increase is not the same as the property tax percentage increase. He presented a pie chart the displayed the breakdown of 2021 budget revenues, which includes 54 percent from property taxes, 20 percent from state categorical aid, 12 percent from fees for service, 7 percent from federal grants, 4 percent from state general purpose aid and 3 percent from “other” funding sources. He then presented a pie chart of how the 2021 budget dollars will be spent, which includes 24 percent for general government, 23 percent for public safety, 20 percent for highway operations, 17 percent for Human Services, 8 percent for debt service, 3 percent for Public Health, 2 percent for culture and recreation, 2 percent listed as “other/unallocated” and 1 percent for conservation of natural resources.
Kelly showed a graph of the county’s tax capacity compared to the county’s tax rate dating from 2013 to 2021. While the county’s tax capacity has grown at a consistent rate, the county’s tax rate has been far more unstable and inconsistent. Kelly said one of the goals of financial modeling for the future is to strive to obtain more consistency, because a county with a stable tax rate is much more likely to attract new businesses. He presented a slide explaining 2021 county tax impacts using properties with a value of $250,000 that did not have a valuation or classification change in 2020. A residential home with that value would see a decrease of $17.70, a commercial property would see a decrease of $30.09 and agricultural property would see a decrease of $8.84.
Potter said the goal of the county board is focused on keeping its tax rate flat so it can capture the new growth to the county to keep property taxes stable and not have the issues of the past, which included a 17.3 percent levy increase for the 2019 budget. Husom said the State of Minnesota has 57 different classifications for properties and, in Wright County, there are properties listed under 37 different classifications. She added that the state comes up with those guidelines and the county valuations have to be within 90 percent and 105 percent of the state’s market value or the state would take over the process of classifying and valuing properties in the county.
Vetsch described the importance of the Monticello Nuclear Power Plant to the levy for the county. The facility represents 8 percent of the total tax capacity in the county and pays more in property tax than the No. 3 through No. 10 taxpaying properties combined. Xcel Energy has contested its property value, which is set by the state, and, unlike most properties, administrative changes can be made arbitrarily. One of the problems the county had in 2017 before the levy spiked, was due in part to one of the valuation changes the nuclear plant after the county had completed its budget process. Vetsch added that the county budgets only for need and to meet state mandates.
Husom opened the meeting to public comment and residents took turns speaking
Russell Anderson, Rockford
Anderson owns a piece of property had a $900 increase last year and another increase proposed for this year, raising his property taxes by 23.1 percent. His valuation went up considerably and his homestead exclusion dropped from $17,000 in 2020 to $6,000 for 2021. Anderson said he has attempted to reach out to the County Assessor’s Office multiple times, but has yet to meet up with them. He asked the County Board to have the Assessor’s Office contact him. Vetsch said that, the closer properties get to $300,000 the less homestead exclusion remains. Potter added that the time to contest property valuations and classifications is in the spring of each year when the Board of Equalization conducts its city and township meetings.
Steve Smith, Buffalo
Smith asked a two-part question – how much debt does Wright County carry and is there a long-term plan to deal with debt? Vetsch said it is difficult to forecast budgets beyond five years because there are too many anomalies and variables that can take place. He added the county will have to ability to call in two bonds early – one in 2024 and another in 2026 or 2027 – which would remove approximately $3 million in debt service at that time. Vetsch said the county’s current debt service is approximately $145 million, but it will drop substantially over the next six years. The county has a goal of eliminating the majority of its debt by 2030. The driver behind that goal was the potential that the Xcel nuclear plant would close in 2030, but it looks as though an extension to the life of the facility is going to be granted. The removal of debt service would help make up for lost revenue in the event that the nuclear plant closed down. Husom said the county was able to pay off the remaining debt from the old County Jail in 2020. She added that there is $18 billion in property value in the county and that the county could carry debt as high as $500 million, adding that it would never happen with this County Board. Potter said the annual debt service is dropping $12 million a year. He added that there is no expectation that the county will be bonding any big-ticket projects for the next 10 years. The next potential significant bond issue would likely be for a river-crossing bridge near Monticello on the Mississippi River and that may be decades away from fruition. Potter added that the county’s infrastructure needs will be met for the next 10 years to come. He stated Wright County has moved from a AA bond rating from Standard & Poor’s to a AA+ rating and is on the cusp of being the first Minnesota county with a population of less than 200,000 to have a AAA rating – the benchmark for financial stability.
Brandon Hanebuth, Clearwater
Hanebuth said the timeline to contest a property value isn’t spelled out very clearly and needs to be improved. He said that the United States loses 250,000 acres of farmland every year. He referenced a slide from the PowerPoint presentation about properties of $250,000 and decreases in property taxes. He stated most farm properties are valued at more than $300,000 a year, so the model using $250,000 is unrealistic. He said that, thanks to COVID-19, the majority of county employees are teleworking and asked how that may impact the life span of county facilities. Husom said the county was mindful that more employees with be teleworking in the future and the new facilities were sized to take that into account. Hanebuth pointed out that Clearwater is much different than the more urbanized cities in the county and whether valuations of farm properties can be changed. Daleiden said the County Board has no authority to change valuations, citing that he owns two commercial properties that pay more taxes than his home, despite the home having a higher value. In many instances, the county’s hands are tied. Husom added she can’t fathom why there are 57 different classification. Vetsch said there needs to be Legislative changes to make a tangible difference to assist farm owners. Hanebuth said he understands that there are numerous taxing districts and appreciates the county’s efforts to keep its taxes stable, but it remains a source of frustration for farmers.
Layne Roschen, St. Michael
Roschen spoke for more than 40 minutes and covered a range of topics. He asked about the longevity of the Xcel nuclear facility, which Vetsch said will be seeking an extension from the Public Utilities Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to extend its life to 2040 and potentially 2050. Roschen asked about the impact of COVID-19 financially speaking. Vetsch said there will likely be an increased demand for Health & Human Services due to a significant increase in mental health issues that require services. Roschen asked if the county is reigning in spending to eliminate items from the 2021 budget and what areas are being reduced or eliminated. Vetsch said the cost to be a member of Trailblazer Transit has been cut in half due to being invested in the MnDOT program. He stated out-of-home placement has gone down significantly, which Vetsch attributed to successful Health & Human Services initiatives. Borrell said the County Board looks to make cuts in every budget cycle, but Wright County is a growth county and requires more employees to meet the increase demands of a growth county.
Roschen asked how much of the county’s budget is driven by state and federal mandates. Husom said public safety costs are largely driven by mandates as well as portions of department budgets across the board. Roschen asked about the growth of the county’s tax capacity and how much of that is valuation. Potter stated the 6.99 percent increase in 2020 represents new construction only because existing property values can fluctuate. In terms of debt service, Vetsch said that the current annual debt service for the county is a little more than $11.5 million. By 2030, that debt service amount should be down to $8.5 million annually. Vetsch said that, at the current pace, the county could get its tax rate from 43.5 down to 41. Potter said there have been more than 50 plats recorded each of the last two years and that will continue to add to the county’s growth because those plats have yet to be constructed. Potter said that, by the year 2040, Wright County will likely have a population of 200,000 because the growth has been sustained for so long and shows no sign of slowing down.
Roschen asked what the value of membership the Association of Minnesota Counties does for Wright County. Vetsch said they serve as a lobbying firm. Daleiden said they represent the county’s interests and representing all counties, AMC helps present a common voice to the State Legislature. Husom said the AMC conferences the commissioners attend are extremely valuable for information gathering. Borrell added that the National Association of Counties doesn’t have the same level of value. Roschen asked about the county being more transparent with information. Husom said the county has taken steps to increase public awareness of information that is made available to residents and that board meetings are live streamed. Daleiden said that the county is going to update its website because the current website isn’t very user-friendly. It is planned to have the updated website operational by the time the new Government Center opens. Daleiden said the budgets and what is spent each week is linked to every board agenda on the county website
Husom closed the public comment period. Vetsch thanked those who attended the meeting, stating that it is an important part of the budget process. Daleiden said this County Board has tried to improve the accountability and transparency of county government and has come a long way in the last decade.
The meeting adjourned at 7:36 p.m.
County Board minutes submitted by John Holler, Communication Specialist Published in the Herald Journal, Jan. 8, 2021.
BOARD MINUTES BOARD OF WRIGHT COUNTY COMMISSIONERSDecember 15, 2020 DATE APPROVED: December 29, 2020
The Wright County Board met in regular session at 9:00 a.m. with Husom, Potter and Daleiden present. Vetsch and Borrell attended remotely.
COUNTY BOARD MINUTES 12-1-20 REGULAR SESSION
Daleiden moved to approve the minutes of 12-1-20 regular board session as presented. The motion was seconded by Potter and carried 5-0.
COUNTY BOARD MINUTES 12-1-20 EVENING SESSION 2021 BUDGET/LEVY HEARING
Potter moved to approve the minutes of the 12-1-20 Budget/Levy Hearing as presented. The motion was seconded by Daleiden and carried 5-0.
AGENDA
* Borrell petitioned to have discussion of Wright County Ordinance 20-1 added the Agenda. It was placed on the agenda as “G” in the Items for Consideration. Borrell moved the Agenda with the one addition. The motion was seconded by Daleiden and carried 5-0.
CONSENT AGENDA
Vetsch moved to approve the Consent Agenda as presented. The motion was seconded by Daleiden and carried 5-0.
A. ADMINISTRATION
1. 2021 Minnesota Cities Participation Program
2. Accept Proposal from BKV for Architect Design Services for Dental Clinic
3. Approve CHIPS Contract 2021-2023
4. Approve Charitable Location Calendar Raffle of the MN Elk Breeders, Gambling Permit X-34985-21-013 January 9, 2021 Black Velvet Elk Ranch, 8361 30th St. SW, Howard Lake, MN 55349
5. Approve Changes to Wright County Financial Policies D. Capital Improvement Policy Per Preliminary Budget Recommendation
6. Construction Proposal Request for the Government Center and Campus Per Listing on the Request for Board Action Form.
B. AUDITOR/TREASURER
1. Approve the 2021 Non-Levied Budgets
Expenses Revenues
41. Ditch Fund $0.00 $0.00
02. Reserves $1,343,700 $1,900,000
2. Approve the Transfers from the General Fund to the Attached County Ditch Accounts, Total $139,154.60 to Cover 2020 Year-End Deficit Balances as Allowed by MS103E.655 Subd. 2: Ditch #3 $252.94; Ditch #5 $136.49; Ditch #7 $53.63; Ditch #8 $171.74; Ditch #12 $290.19; Ditch #13 $7,972.75; Ditch #14 $180.43; Ditch #16 $11,674.87; Ditch #18 $147.85; Ditch #19 $10,566.79; Ditch #20 $45,831.53; Ditch #22 $27,903.85; Ditch #23 $1,145.09; Ditch #29 $3,314.00; Ditch #31 $21,078.06; Ditch #35 $463.44; County Ditch #36 $5,677; Joint Ditch #1 $759.31 and Joint Ditch #3 $1,055.19
3. Approve the Transfers from the General Fund to the Following Negative Accounts, Total $95,085.92 to Cover 2020 Year-End Deficit Balance: Historian $40,534.18 and Soil & Water $54,551.74
4. Approve the Transfer from the General Fund to the Debt Service Fund (Fund 36) for the Subordinate Sewer District $76,774.80 to Cover 2020 Year-End Deficit Balance. This Balance Will Need to Be Reassessed
5. Approve the Transfer from the General Fund to the Capital Project Funds (Fund 34) for Negative Cash in the Wright County Sheriff’s Office Training Center to Cover 2020 Year-End Deficit of $706,626.79
6. Approve the Budget Amendment for the Increase of Elections Budget:
01-071-000-0000-5229 STATE SHARED REVENUE ($37,088)
12-15-20 COUNTY BOARD MINUTES Page 2 of 12
01-071-000-0000-5502 FEE – FILING FEE ($830)
01-071-000-0000-5801 REFUNDS AND REIMBURSEMENTS ($18,143)
01-071-000-0000-6101 FULL-TIME PERSONNEL ($1,330)
01-071-000-0000-6104 TEMPORARY PERSONNEL ($8,510)
01-071-000-0000-6106 OVERTIME ($22,038)
01-071-000-0000-6153 COUNTY SHARE INSURANCE ($172)
01-071-000-0000-6162 MEDICARE ($523)
01-071-000-0000-6163 PERA ($2,140)
01-071-000-0000-6175 SOCIAL SECURITY ($2,295)
01-071-000-0000-6205 POSTAGE ($10,158)
01-071-000-0000-6235 PUBLICATIONS & BROCHURES ($970)
01-071-000-0000-6260 SOFTWARE SYSTEMS SUPPORT ($17,924)
01-071-000-0000-6261 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES ($6,437)
01-071-000-0000-6411 OPERATING SUPPLIES ($62,933)
01-071-000-0000-6412 OPERATING SUPPLIES – SPECIAL ELECTION ($5,500)
01-071-000-0000-6485 ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT ($5,060)
01-100-000-0000-6199 UNALLOCATED PERSONNEL SERVICES ($43,081)
7. Approve the Budget Amendment to Move Highway Fleet Maintenance to the Unallocated:
34-170-000-8000-6600 CIP Budget – Unallocated Fund ($3,173)
34-170-100-8184-6600 CIP Budget – Highway Fleet Maintenance (-$3,173)
8. Request Position Replacement for Elections Technology Coordinator
9. Approve Renewal of 2021 Tobacco Licenses for the Following: City of Monticello – Fleet Farm Wholesale Supply Co., LLC DBA Fleet Farm; Fleet Farm Wholesale Supply Co., LLC DBA Fleet Farm Fuel; Broadway Kwik Stop, LLC DBA Broadway Kwik Stop
10. Acknowledge Warrants Issued Between November 24, 2020 and December 8, 2020
C. COUNTY ATTORNEY
1. Approve and Authorize Signatures on the Retainer Agreement with Rinke-Noonan for Public Drainage Legal Services
2. Approve and Authorize Signatures on the Developer’s Agreement for Railroad Crossing Improvements in the City of Albertville (CSAH 37 and 19)
3. Authorize Signatures on Contracts for Professional Services of Guardianship and/or Conservatorship With Eight Individuals/Entities
D. HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES
1. Position Replacements
A. Office Technician I
B. Social Worker
E. HUMAN RESOURCES/ADMINISTRATION
1. Approve an Extension of the Voluntary Leave of Absence Without Pay Program Through July 1, 2021
2. Approve a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) for the County Contributions for the 2021 Health Insurance Plans With AFSCME (Human Services) Council 65
F. SURVEYOR
1. Authorize County Surveyor to Sign on Behalf of Wright County the Professional Services Agreement With Schneider Geospatial for Beacon
G. PARKS & RECREATION
1. Confirm Commissioner District 1 Parks Commission Appointment (Martyn Dibben of Buffalo) Effective January 1, 2021. Term Ends December 31, 2024 (Three-Year Term)
2. Confirm Commissioner District 2 Parks Commission Appointment (Melanie Leckey of Clearwater) Effective January 1, 2021. Terms Ends December 31, 2024 (Three-Year Term)
TIMED AGENDA ITEMS
TOM KELLY, COUNTY ATTORNEY
Recognition of Tom Kelly’s Years of Service
Kelly thanked outgoing Commissioners Borrell and Potter for the service to Wright County for being good stewards for the county’s residents. He stated he has been employed by Wright County for 37 years – the last 22 as the elected County Attorney. When he started working Wright County in 1984, there were just eight employees. Now there are 29 employees, 24 of which were hired by Kelly. His office has more than 500 years of collective experience. One of his priorities when appointed Chief of the Criminal Division was to meet with Wright County law enforcement agencies to stress working with a team approach. At that time he started a training program for law enforcement to teach criminal law and procedures that is still in operation. Kelly worked with five sheriffs (Darrell Wolff, Don Hozempa, Gary Miller, Joe Hagerty and Sean Deringer). He thanked Mike MacMillan and his Court Services staff for the team approach they had with the County Attorney’s Office. He thanked his employees over the last 22 years and the positive impact they had on Wright County citizens – highlighting the contributions of Chief Deputy Brian Asleson, Office Manager Cindy Hohl and Brian Lutes, who will be replacing Kelly as County Attorney. He closed his remarks by thanking his wife Holly and children Megan and Matt.
Husom commended the accomplishments the County Attorney’s Office has achieved under Kelly’s leadership and the work ethic of his office. Borrell thanked Kelly for his commitment to our military and our veterans. Daleiden thanked Kelly for sharing his wit, wisdom and sense of humor with the County Board. Potter expressed his appreciation that Kelly shared his vision for designing the Justice Center with the county’s needs 20 years in the future in mind. Vetsch told Kelly he will be missed when he leaves office.
ADMINISTRATION
Introduction of Administration’s Office Manager Elizabeth Clow and Administrative Specialist Angie Fisher
Assistant County Administrator Sue Vergin introduced Clow and Fisher. Clow comes to Wright County from Quincy, Illinois, where she served as Human Resources Director. Fisher comes to Wright County from the Elk River Police Department, where she was a receptionist and transcriptionist.
BOB HIIVALA, AUDITOR/TREASURER
Approve 2020 and 2021 Tobacco License for AMBEMA Retails LLC DBA South Haven Sports (City of South Haven) for the Period of December 15, 2020 Through December 31, 2021
Hiivala explained that most tobacco license requests go on the Consent Agenda, but this is a new license that is requesting a license for 12••• months (the remainder of 2020 and all of 2021). Daleiden moved to approve the tobacco license request. The motion was seconded by Potter and carried 5-0.
Approve Resolution to Accept Donation of $100 from Dale and Carol Mossey Pursuant to M.S. 465.05
Hiivala said that the Mosseys select a person or group to be the recipient of a surprise award from their family which they call the Mossey Annual Above and Beyond Award. The Mosseys selected the staff of the Auditor/Treasurer’s Office as the recipient of the award for 2020. The criteria for the award are doing something that exemplifies the commitment to others and the greater community, acting in a manner greater than reasonable expectations, exemplifying leadership and having made a significant difference to others. The Auditor/Treasurer’s Office was selected for its work in the November elections. Daleiden moved to accept the donation from the Mossey family. The motion was seconded by Potter and carried 5-0. Hiivala said his staff worked very hard with the elections, especially given the greater number of absentee ballots that were mailed in and needed to be counted.
Authorize the Auditor to Do Improvements/Demolition to the Tax-Forfeited Parcel #209-000-223103
Hiivala said this item had been brought to the County Board previously and Borrell had asked that it be tabled because the property had a homestead entitlement on it, but the home has fallen into disrepair and potentially poses a danger to an adjoining property which is down an embankment from the home. Wright County Planning & Zoning looked at the property and deemed it to be an unbuildable parcel. Hiivala said he has received a quote to demolish and remove the building for $14,185. Daleiden said for that scope of work, the quote was very reasonable. Borrell thanked Hiivala and the Planning & Zoning staff for taking a closer look at the property to determine with certainty that the property was unbuildable. Potter moved to approve the demolition of the structure on the tax-forfeit property. The motion was seconded by Daleiden and carried 5-0.
Approve November Revenue/Expenditure Budget and CIP Report
In November, there had been questions raised about the line item for court-appointed counsel, which was higher than the budgeted amount. Hiivala said that over the years, that line item has been very inconsistent and that 2020 has been a year when it has spiked higher than normal. Vetsch moved to approve the November Revenue/Expenditure Budget and CIP Report. The motion was seconded by Borrell and carried 5-0.
GREG PICKARD, VETERAN SERVICES
Resolution to Appoint CVSO to Administer the CVSO Operational Improvement Grant
Pickard said that the state changed the process in which the annual grant is administered. He said he would send the board resolution to the state for an electronic signature. The grant is in the amount of $15,000 and is paid based on the veteran population in each county. Daleiden moved to appoint Pickard to administer the 2021 County Veterans Service Office Operational Improvement Grant. The motion was seconded by Borrell and carried 5-0.
MARC MATTICE, PARKS & RECREATION
Take Action on Parks Commission Recommendations from the November 9, 2020 Meeting
Approve Recommended Changes to the Wright County Parks & Recreation Department’s Memorial and Recognition Policy
Mattice said the fees in the Memorial and Recognition Policy for memorial trees, benches and tables haven’t gone up in several years, while the costs to his department have risen and the Parks Commission recommended raising the fees to help cover the internal costs. He said the Memorial and Recognition Policy would remove the planting of trees option since only one tree has been donated since the policy was adopted in 2005 and that the fee for a memorial bench or table would be $250. Daleiden moved to approve the changes to the Memorial and Recognition Policy reflecting the changes recommended by the Parks Commission. The motion was seconded by Borrell and carried 5-0.
Approve Recommended Rental Fees for Park & Recreation System Camper Cabins and Tandem Sites
Mattice said the rental fee proposed for the camper cabins and tandem campsites in Bertram Chain of Lakes Regional Park will be as follows: large camper cabin $65 a night for Wright County residents and $69 a night for non-residents; small camper cabin $55 a night for residents, $59 a night for non-residents; tandem site $48 a night for residents and $52 a night for non-residents. He added that seeding of turf grass has begun and the opening of the campground is expected to be the weekend before or after the 4th of July, depending on how quickly the turf grass is established in the spring and early summer. Husom commented that the cabins will be an excellent addition to the Wright County parks system and the prices are very reasonable. Vetsch moved to approve the rental fees recommended by the Planning Commission for the camper cabins and tandem sites in Bertram Chain of Lakes Park. The motion was seconded by Daleiden and carried 5-0.
MATT DETJEN, AG AND DRAINAGE
Approval to Accept a Quote from Ashwill Companies for Tree Removal on County Ditch #10
Detjen said the quote from Ashwill Companies of Cokato of $133,300 was extremely good (the next lowest bid of the five bidders who submitted the full bid package was $297,934). He added that by bidding tree removal and seeding separately, there would be a savings of approximately $565,000 on the total project and the Ashwill bid was lower than the projections had indicated. The tree removal will take place in the entire 12-mile length of the ditch and only excludes areas where landowners said they would remove trees in the ditch line themselves. Borrell moved to accept the bid from Ashwill for tree removal from County Ditch 10 in the amount of $133,300. The motion was seconded by Daleiden and carried 5-0.
VIRGIL HAWKINS, HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT
Approve Resolution Authorizing Final Payment to Greystone Construction in the Amount of $14,727.53 for the New Salt Shed Construction at the Highway Maintenance Truck Station in Waverly. The Total Value of the Construction of the Salt Shed Is $136,839.50, Which Includes a $10,000 for Work Completed by County Staff
Borrell thanked Hawkins for getting the overdue replacement of the salt shed completed. Borrell said he had received many complaints over the years because it was too small and, when it would rain, it would dissolve some of the salt. There was a collection pond in place, but there were concerns because it was so clearly visible. Potter moved to authorize final payment to Greystone Construction in the amount of $14,727.53 for the new salt shed constructing at the Highway Maintenance Truck Station in Waverly. The motion was seconded by Borrell and carried 5-0.
Approve Resolution of Final Acceptance for Contract 1806 (SP 086-638-006) for the CSAH 38 Reconstruction Improvements from Odean Avenue to Trunk Highway 101 in Otsego and Authorize Final Payment to Fehn Companies, Inc. in the Amount of $44,417.59. The Final Value of the Work Is $4,441,759.25
Potter moved to authorize final payment to Fehn Companies Inc. in the amount of $44,417.59 for the CSAH 38 reconstruction improvements from Odean Avenue to Highway 101 in Otsego. The motion was seconded by Daleiden and carried 5-0.
Approve Resolution of Final Acceptance for Contract No. 1901 and Authorize Final Payment to Knife River Corporation in the Amount of $64,138.34. Contract No. 1901 Was the 2019 Pavement Preservation Program and Included Segments of CSAH 5, CSAH 7, CSAH 35 and CSAH 38. The Final Value of Work Certified is $5,819,833.99
Potter moved to authorize final payment to Knife River Corporation in the amount of $64,138.34 for the 2019 pavement preservation program contract. The motion was seconded by Borrell and carried 5-0.
Approve the Minutes of the December 1, 2020 Transportation Committee of the Whole Meeting Along With the Recommendations
Hawkins said there were four topics of discussion at the Transportation Committee of the Whole meeting – review and approve updates to the Highway Department’s Five-Year Plan, review and approve updates to the county’s Long-Range Transportation Plan (LRTP), review the County Road 138 route change and a presentation by Hally Turner, the Policy Planning Director for the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT) dealing with the Statewide Multi-Modal Transportation Plan. The county’s Five-Year Plan was presented by Assistant Highway Engineer Chad Hausmann and the updates, which cover the years 2021-25, were unanimously recommended for approval. There were minor changes made to the LRTP, which was initially adopted in September 2019. The consensus of the Committee was to recommend approval of the LRTP with the revisions. The initial plan for County Road 138 was to change its designation to CSAH 83 between Highways 55 and 25, but MnDOT wouldn’t permit the county to take the CSAH designation off of CSAH 41 to make the designation switch. The new plan is to make the change between CSAH 12 and Highway 25. Turner provided and update on MnDOT’s updated Multi-Modal Transportation Plan.
Potter said the committee minutes are on the agenda as attachments and are available for anyone wishing to examine the changes and updates made to the county’s Five-Year Plan and LRTP, adding that the county is looking to have as much transparency as possible.
Vetsch moved to approve the minutes of the December 1, 2020 Transportation Committee of the Whole meeting and the recommendations. The motion was seconded by Daleiden and carried 5-0.
12-1-20 TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE MINUTES
I. Review and Approve/Adopt Update to Five-Year Plan & Map (2021-2025)
Background:
The Wright County Highway Five-Year Construction Plan & Map is generally updated every two years. The update involves adding two years to the plan and updating/revising the other years within the plan after taking input and feedback from the public and adjusting for any changes to anticipated revenues and costs. The current Five-Year Plan and Map covers the years 2019 to 2023 and the updated Five-Year Plan & Map covers the years 2021 to 2025.
Public input and feedback for the Five-Year Plan & Map update was received through a page on our website that was available to the public from September 9, 2020 through October 6, 2020. We received about 12 comments on the Draft 2021-2025 Plan that we addressed and took into consideration at the Five-Year Plan update team meetings. Attached is the updated Five-Year plan & Map for 2021 to 2025 for review/comments.
It is understood that the projects identified in this Five-Year Plan & Map are subject to available funding sources that will be budgeted on an annual basis for each year, and that changes/revisions will be made based on available funding and/or changing priorities.
Please note that some of the projects shown for years 2023, 2024, and 2025 are subject to funding from the Local Option Sales Tax for Transportation (LOST program) that is set to expire December 31, 2022. The projects subject to LOST funding will be deleted from the Five-Year Plan if the LOST program is not extended.
Discussion:
Chad noted that construction projects are somewhat fluid, indicating that a few projects were moved up in the schedule to this year while others were pushed back.
Commissioner Borrell: Regarding the roundabout project located at Tiger Drive – will that be constructed in 2021? Chad: said yes, it will be constructed this summer and the project will be like the mini-RAB that was built at the intersection of Highway 18 and Highway 22 near the Middle School East in St. Michael. The project set for 2021, which we have a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the City of Delano.
Commissioner Daleiden: when will public be able to comment on 19/35 in St Michael? Chad: stated that they are working with the project consultant about the dates to present a virtual open house. Virgil also indicated that they are working to have the Open House in December.
Steve Bot: Extended his appreciation and thanked the County Board and the Highway Department for putting together the Five-Year Plan with a lot of good projects that are needed and to offer support for the Local Option Sales Tax going forward to keep these projects on schedule.
Commissioner Daleiden: We can always change the plan too, if something high priority comes up? Virgil: Correct, even though the plan shows five years of projects and funding, it is subject to the annual budget review and approval of each year of funding by the County Board.
Highway Staff Recommendation:
Highway Department staff recommends approving/adopting the attached Five-Year Plan and Map that covers the years 2021 to 2025.
TCOTW ACTION/COUNTY BOARD RECOMMENDATION:
Consensus is to approve/adopt the presented 5-year plan and map
II. Review and approve/adopt update to Long-Range Transportation Plan (LRTP)
Update:
The Wright County 2040 Long-Range Transportation Plan (LRTP) was approved by the County Board in September of 2019. The LRTP provides guidance for the County’s transportation system for continued growth and corresponding travel needs over the next 20-plus years. The 131-page document resides on our Highway Department website and is available to the public via the following link: http://www.co.wright.mn.us/DocumentCenter/View/17953/WrightCounty---Long-Range-Transportation-Plan. The Plan elements were coordinated with other County efforts and those of key study partners, cities, townships, and MnDOT. Important plan elements include:
• Assessment of existing conditions and identification of critical needs
• Identification of township and city concerns
• Establishment of long-term goals, objectives, and performance measures
• Preparation of 25-year traffic forecasts
• A future system planning analysis that proposes improvements and functional class changes, as part of a 20-plus year multimodal transportation system
• Preparation of plan implementation strategies and funding opportunities to advance recommended system improvements.
The LRTP is a living document that will be updated/revised over time. This initial update includes minor revisions that were identified through feedback and input from transportation partners and stakeholders over the past year since it was initially adopted.
Discussion:
Sara Buermann, Traffic Engineer, went through the summary page of changes/minor revisions that have been made to the Long-Range Transportation Plan (LRTP).
Commissioner Husom: These documents, did the townships get these ahead of time, since we haven’t had a township officers meeting in a long time.
Virgil: We can send the documents from this meeting out to the townships.
Highway Staff Recommendation:
Highway Department staff recommends approving/adopting the updated LRTP that will incorporate the summary sheet and revised pages.
TCOTW ACTION/COUNTY BOARD RECOMMENDATION:
Consensus is to approve/adopt the updated LRTP
III. Review CR 138 Route Change Status
Background:
The County Board approved a resolution at their April 21, 2020 meeting to make the following highway route designation changes, in accordance with recommendations made at the February 4, 2020 Transportation Committee of the Whole meeting.
• County State Aid Highway (CSAH) 41 changes to County Road (CR) 114
• County Road (CR) 138 changes to County State Aid Highway (CSAH) 83
However, MnDOT informed us on May 27, 2020 (after prior approving the route changes) that we could not remove the “CSAH” designation from highway 41 since it was a Trunk Highway turnback in 1974. This means that we were 0.8 banked miles short of being able to make the intended changes to CR 183.
Therefore, we proceeded to apply 1.14 of our 1.27 available “banked CSAH” mileage to change CR 138 to CSAH 83 from CSAH 12 to TH 25, and this was authorized by MnDOT. It is important that this segment was changed to CSAH 83 so that we can use State Aid Funds to help pay our share of the intersection improvement in 2024 (RAB at TH 25 that we received a $1,000,000 grant through the MnDOT LPP program).
Therefore, our CSAH miles went from 406.44 miles to 407.58 that we are currently “drawing needs” from the gas-tax revenue in according with the funding distribution from the HUTDF (Highway User Tax Distribution Fund).
Discussion:
Commissioner Husom: So, the reason we couldn’t do 41 because it was formerly T.H. 25, is that why?
Virgil: Yes, this was a state highway turnback in 1974 and because of the state rules on Trunk Highway turnbacks, we can’t take it off our CSAH system and “bank” the mileage.
Commissioner Daleiden: Is all the Highway 41 mileage located in the City of Buffalo? Virgil: responded that some of Highway 41 is in the City of Buffalo and some of it is in Buffalo Township. Eventually, with development/annexation in the future the entire highway will be within the city and subject to a turnback to the city.
Highway Staff Recommendation:
When enough “banked CSAH mileage” is available, proceed with route designation change of remaining portion of CR 138 (from TH 55 to CSAH 12, 0.922 miles) – changing it to “CSAH 83”, as originally intended. We currently have 0.13 “banked CSAH miles” available after changing CR 138 to CSAH 83 (from CSAH 12 to TH 25).
TCOTW ACTION/COUNTY BOARD RECOMMENDATION:
This is an informational item.
IV. MnDOT Statewide Multimodal Transportation Plan Update
Background:
Hally Turner, MnDOT Policy Planning Director, will present the latest information to the Transportation Committee on MnDOT’s Statewide Multimodal Transportation Plan.
MnDOT is updating their highest transportation policy plan in Minnesota—the Statewide Multimodal Transportation Plan. The SMTP sets objectives, performance measures and strategies to help advance the Minnesota GO vision of a multimodal transportation system that maximizes the health of people, the environment and our economy over the next 20 years. MnDOT is currently finalizing background information and asking the public, stakeholders, and partners to complete surveys to help select up to six focus areas for this update.
MnDOT Advisory committees will convene in early 2021 to select the areas of focus and to start drafting strategies. There are four opportunities for input right now that MnDOT is presenting to gather information:
1. Share your transportation story via a fun fill-in-the-blank activity
2. Help us select up to six focus areas by completing this survey before January 8, 2021
3. Comment on the Public Participation Plan before December 18, 2020
4. Request a virtual presentation
Visit www.minnesotago.org for more information and participate in the surveys or leave a comment.
Discussion:
Commissioner Borrell: doesn’t like that there wasn’t as much focus on global warming. He asked is it getting cooler or warmer?
Hally: It’s doing both, climate is warmer, but the weather is colder.
Commissioner Borrell: Mentioning that he is farming and coming off a good last three years of high yields, Charlie is liking the climate, however noted he is against pollution. If lowering pollution helps climate change, he wishes they would address it more on their side.
Commissioner Vetsch: Will the public be able to find the survey on the website www.minnesotago.org?
Hally: replied yes, the survey and more information are all available on the website.
Commissioner Vetsch: mentioned jurisdictional barriers, saying from a transit perspective, they seem like they could be a strong barrier for future projects and planning for MnDOT and the county.
Hally: stated that MnDOT takes into consideration and reviews critical connections beyond the barriers/boundaries when planning.
Highway Staff Recommendation:
This is an informational item.
LEE KELLY, COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR
Consideration of the Resolution to Make the Office of Wright County Auditor/Treasurer an Appointed Position
Husom provided some background. She stated that, as the 10th largest county in Minnesota, Wright County has had to re-examine many aspects of county government to find more efficiencies. The Auditor/Treasurer’s Office has been tasked with numerous functions that are outside the scope of finances. There was considerable discussion in recent months about making the switch from an elected Auditor/Treasurer to an appointed position and Hiivala gave his blessing to splitting the department into two separate divisions – one dealing with the day-to-day functions of finance and the other dealing with the core functions of the office and long-range “big picture” planning efforts.
Public Comment Regarding the Resolution to Make the Office of Wright County Auditor/Treasurer an Appointed Position
Husom opened the public comment period. There were no individuals in the County Boardroom or attending remotely that chose to speak. Daleiden asked County Administrator Lee Kelly if he had received any comments. Kelly said this Agenda item had been posted on the county website and published in the official county newspaper for the last two weeks and that no comments had been received. Vetsch said that he had some discussions with residents of his district and all were understanding that the rationale for this decision was for long-term continuity of the office and work efficiencies. Husom then closed the public comment period.
Approval of the Resolution to Make the Office of Wright County Auditor/Treasurer an Appointed Position
Hiivala said he appreciated the retention of the Auditor/Treasurer position as a core function of government. Potter said that Wright County is large enough and the workload is so diverse that dividing up job duties became necessary within the Auditor/Treasurer’s Office. He added that the fear with such an important position as Auditor/Treasurer being an elected position was the potential for someone with name recognition or a highly financed campaign could win an election and not be qualified for the duties required of an Auditor/Treasurer. Making the switch to an appointed position puts a safeguard that the Auditor/Treasurer will be qualified for the duties needed for the position moving forward.
Vetsch moved the resolution to make the Auditor/Treasurer an appointed position. The motion was seconded by Daleiden and it carried 5-0.
Approval of the Contract to Make the Office of Wright County Auditor/Treasurer an Appointed Position
Vetsch said the purpose of the contract was to formalize the agreement to transition the Auditor/Treasurer an appointed position and to assure that the agreement had Hiivala’s blessing to move forward.
Vetsch moved to approve the contract to make the Auditor/Treasurer an appointed position. The motion was seconded by Daleiden and carried 5-0.
ITEMS FOR CONSIDERATION
12-2-20 COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE MINUTES
At today’s meeting, Daleiden said that it was his understanding that Wright County was the only county in the state that allocated CARES Act dollars to school districts and thanked Vetsch for coming up with that idea early on in the allocation process.
Daleiden moved to approve the 12-2-20 Committee of the Whole minutes and recommendations. The motion was seconded by Vetsch and carried 5-0.
I. CARES Act Final Summary
Lemieux explained how the $16.57 million Wright County received in CARES Act funds was allocated was expended. Wright County gave away more than 43 percent of its allocation to school districts, small businesses, non-profits and affiliates. The funding silos were completely expended, with the exception of townships, which turned in very few requests for reimbursement from the county. The County Board approved $4.2 million to be earmarked for school districts and the actual amount expended was $4.27 million. The Wright County Economic Development Partnership (WCEDP) was given $2.57 million to administer the small business program and expended $2.42 million. Initially, affiliates were designated $934,779, but, when it was clear that all the funding wouldn’t be needed, $500,000 was transferred from the affiliates line item to the small business line item because more small businesses requested grants than was initially anticipated and exceeded the initial $2 million allocation. Of the $434,779 that remained in the affiliates line item, $433,549 was expended.
Lemieux said that townships that turned over their allocations to have their reimbursement requests administered by the county totaled $432,235. Of that amount, $118,125 was expended, turning back $314,110 to the county. Lemieux said that in the final days of November, townships were returning much of their CARES Act allocations. Vetsch said this was expected because the townships were given relatively large allocations and had very few eligible expenses to exhaust those funds. Husom asked if those cities and townships that had unused funds return the unexpended dollars directly back to the federal government. Lemieux confirmed that is the process for unused CARES Act dollars that cities and townships administered themselves. For the townships that had the county administer their CARES Act expenditures, the unused portions of their allocations reverted back to the county to be used for county expenses.
Lemieux laid out how the county funds were expended. $7,377,549 went for public safety payroll – a figure that was less than half of the salaries for those employees during the CARES Act funding period. $2,067,822 was expended by Health & Human Services, $131,947 went spent on VPN (Virtual Private Network) software upgrades to enable employees to work remotely, $22,754.79 was assigned for Administration and diverted salaries for time spent working on COVID-19 related matters and $140,227 was expended by all other county departments (Personal Protective Equipment and telecommuting expenses)
Lemieux thanked the members of the CARES Committee, which included L. Kelly. S. Vergin, S. Athman, K. Dahl, B. Hiivala, J. Holler, R. Kotila, G. Kryzer and C. Partlow. Vetsch asked how the $2 million for Health & Human Services was expended. Partlow responded it was for salaries of Public Health employees, the creation of a call center, assistance to families and individuals in crisis situations, the purchase of a freezer to store COVID-19 vaccines when they arrive and PPE expenses. Kelly said that there have been discussions at the state of doing a second round of COVID relief funding and there has been debate as to whether the state will administer the funds or send them to the counties. Vetsch said based on what he has been reading, any second round of funding to counties would likely be very nominal.
Husom expressed her gratitude to those on the Wright County CARES Committee for the extensive work it had to do administering the funding and the thousands of invoices and purchase orders it needed to review in the process. Vetsch said there could potentially be a second round of grants because many restaurants have been forced to close for a second time in 2020 due to the pandemic and many are struggling for the survival of their family-owned businesses.
Lemieux said she will be completing the final CARES Act Report by Friday, December 4 and will forward that to the County Board for final approval.
Recommendation: Have the final CARES Act Report placed on the December 15, 2020 agenda for acceptance by the County Board.
II. BUDGET DATA REPORTING
At the annual Budget/Certified Levy Hearing (commonly known as the Truth in Taxation Hearing), a complaint was voiced that county budgets are not readily available to the public during the course of the year and are not easy to find for those who don’t know where they are located on the county website. Lemieux said the Auditor/Treasurer’s Office was looking into make more detailed budget report information available for those who want to delve into more advanced revenue and expenditure data. Daleiden said there are weekly and monthly reports that are readily available for residents to see that are attachments on the County Board’s weekly agendas and the monthly Revenue/Expenditure Reports give percentages of revenues and expenses in real time for how far into the budget year you are at. He also stated that the 2021 preliminary budget should be placed on the website. Lemieux said it will placed on the Auditor/Treasurer’s web page under “Budgets.” Husom said it would be helpful to put the preliminary budget on the county website when it is approved by the County Board in September so that residents will have time to view the detailed budget proposals before the annual Budget/Certified Levy Hearing in early December. Daleiden said when the new county website goes live in 2021 that the budget documentation should be in a more prominent location instead of as a sub-page on the Auditor/Treasurer home page.
Recommendation: Refer to a future County Board workshop discussion about the process of updating weekly and monthly budget documents and placing them in a more prominent position on the county website.
12-8-20 COUNTY BOARD WORKSHOP MINUTES
At today’s meeting, Potter moved to approve the minutes of the 12-8-20 County Board Workshop and the recommendations. The motion was seconded by Daleiden and carried 5-0.
I. Schedule Meetings as Needed
L. Kelly stated the board meeting on December 22 has been cancelled. The next Leadership Committee is scheduled for Tuesday, January 5. Commissioner Husom asked if there is going to be a meeting in December for a Human Services agenda item or if they want to move the item to January. Commissioner Borrell stated he will be leaving office at the beginning of January. He has two meetings scheduled on Monday, January 4 and questioned whether he or M. Kaczmarek should attend those meetings. Commissioner Husom stated they have not had the meeting to determine the committees yet. L. Kelly stated Borrell is still officially the commissioner until the morning of Tuesday, January 5.
II. Architect Design Services for Dental Clinic
Facilities Services Director Alan Wilczek provided the board with information regarding the proposed Architectural Services for the Dental Clinic. Bruce Schwartzman with BKV Group submitted a proposal to provide all the services needed to design the dental clinic, including providing a tour of the recently completed dental clinic in Rochester, ensuring the design team will work with the dental clinic equipment provider and to review and coordinate all required equipment, and provide a complete set of construction documents for a proposed fee of $89,000. David Kane also submitted a proposal for Architectural Services for the Dental Clinic for a proposed fee of $120,800. Community Dental Care would prefer using David Kane for the Architectural Services, as they have used them in the past. Commissioner Husom stated that BKV Group has already designed the building and they know the space. There could be efficiencies in keeping BKV. Commissioner Daleiden asked if BKV Group has ever designed a dental clinic. Wilczek responded that dental clinics are not BKV’s specialty, but it should not be overly complicated for them. Commissioner Vetsch stated that BKV Group is significantly cheaper. J. Goodrum Schwartz has been in touch with UCare. The grant could be applied toward architectural fees. She is anticipating $100,000 in grant funds. S. Vergin reiterated the funds could be used toward architectural fees. Commissioner Borrell stated the U.S. Department of Agriculture has a large sum of grant funds available. He stated it would be worth asking if the dental facility would qualify for any of the grants. He will provide contact information to L. Kelly.
Recommendation: All in favor of moving forward with BKV Group for the Architect Design Services for the Dental Clinic.
III. Commissioners Handbook
L. Kelly stated he wanted the Commissioners Handbook to be thorough because the Commissioners have a great deal of responsibilities and are involved in a lot of things. Commissioner Husom asked if the commissioners could do some tweaks here and there, such as removing words/parenthesis. Commissioner Vetsch stated he would like to go through the information and elaborate on some parts. Commissioner Husom stated the document is good and there is a lot of information. She suggested scheduling a committee of the whole at the beginning of January, after the committees have been assigned. S. Vergin stated she hopes this document is a resource that will be utilized by the new commissioners. It is a working document that will be updated as information changes and it includes links to relevant state statues and county policies. The document will be available via SharePoint and each commissioner may request a copy of a printed document as well. Commissioner Husom stated anyone on the committees should review the information for accuracy, as changes may have been made to a committee. The Owners Committee – Courts Facility can be removed from the document. Commissioner Daleiden questioned the Clearwater River Watershed District Advisory Committee. Commissioner Husom stated the board appoints members but does not have the ability to make recommendations or view the supporting documentation. She stated she would like to see the Clearwater River Watershed District Advisory Committee present an annual report to the county board. Commissioner Daleiden asked if B. Asleson could review the committee to see if it was operating as it should. B. Asleson stated it is clear you have to appoint members to the board and that he would continue to look through the state statute and let the commissioners know if he finds anything.
Recommendation: Schedule a Committee of the Whole to discuss the Commissioners Handbook in January, after the committee assignments are selected on January 5. Each commissioner can provide input on the contents of the handbook, specifically on the committees and their functions.
IV. CHIPS Contract
L. Kelly presented the CHIPS contract to the commissioners. The proposed contract is very similar to the current contract and will commence on January 1, 2021 and terminate of December 31, 2023. The big change to the contract is the date but there has been some added wording to provide clarification. B. Asleson touched on the changes to the contract. He stated Ms. Gabriel will no longer do any appeals which means the county may be funding those outside of this contract. Commissioner Husom stated she appreciates Ms. Gabriel presenting before the board in the past and said she has been a strong advocate for those in need in the past. Commissioner Borrell asked if J. Goodrum-Schwartz or B. Asleson could further explain the contract. B. Asleson stated in 2008, this expense was passed down from the state to individual counties. Wright County has contracted with Ms. Gabriel since that time. The contract has been successful, and she provides representation even at the initial hearings. His office is in favor of continuing the contract. Commission Daleiden asked if she works with other counties. B. Asleson stated she previously did some work in Sherburne County, but he believes that has dropped off. She has a private practice for other matters.
Recommendation: Extend the CHIPS Contract with Ms. Gabriel.
V. Training Center Walk-Through
The Sheriff’s Office Training Center Virtual Tour was presented to the commissioners. Commissioner Potter asked if the video has been released to the public yet. F. Petitta stated that it has not been. Commissioner Husom stated she would like to get the video out to the public since it was a controversial topic, and suggested if the public have any questions, they can call the commissioners. F. Petitta said he could have the video posted by the end of the day.
Recommendation: Post the Sheriff’s Office Training Center Virtual Tour for public viewing.
Commissioner Daleiden stated he was looking for clarification regarding the medical clinic in the new government center and would like an explanation on how this will bring the cost to the county down eventually. Commissioner Vetch stated the medical clinic would provide savings to both the employee and the county because the services would be provided at a lower cost than visiting the doctor. The idea is to get as many employees and families to use the clinic; if they can get cheaper health care, this will likely happen. L. Kelly said there is also a convenience factor with the new clinic. Employees won’t have to spend as much time away from work to visit the doctor. The clinic could also be used for pre-employment physicals as well. When the clinic was first discussed several years ago, the Anoka County medical clinic was discussed. T. Hoffman asked if anyone has reached out to them. S. Johnson stated it may take a while for to get the clinic up and running, but employees will begin taking advantage of it. There are many different options available for the county to consider. Anoka County is unique in the fact that HealthPartners is not their provider.
RESOLUTION SETTING COUNTY ATTORNEY’S SALARY FOR 2021
Vetsch moved to approve setting the County Attorney’s salary for 2021 at $162,000. The motion was seconded by Daleiden and carried 5-0.
RESOLUTION SETTING COUNTY BOARD SALARY FOR 2021
Potter moved to approve setting the County Board’s salary for 2021 at $51,045. The motion was seconded by Borrell and carried 5-0.
RESOLUTION SETTING AUDITOR/TREASURER’S SALARY FOR 2021
Daleiden moved to approve setting the Auditor/Treasurer’s salary for 2021 at $140,235. The motion was seconded by Vetsch and carried 5-0.
RESOLUTION SETTING THE SHERIFF’S SALARY FOR 2021
Potter moved to approve setting the Sheriff’s salary for 2021 at $161,500. The motion was seconded by Daleiden and carried 5-0.
RESOLUTION ESTABLISHING THE 2021 BUDGET AND 2021 CERTIFIED LEVY
Daleiden moved to establish the 2021 Wright County budget at $153,827,373. The motion was seconded by Vetsch and carried 5-0.
Daleiden moved setting the 2021 certified property tax levy at $78,944,903. The motion was seconded by Potter and carried 5-0.
* WRIGHT COUNTY ORDINANCE 20-1
Borrell said he would like to have the County Board discuss Ordinance 20-1 before the end of the year, requesting it be placed on the December 29 County Board Agenda. Ordinance 20-1 was recently discussed at a Planning Commission meeting and deals with the placement of treatment/recovery facilities in agricultural land settings.
Borrell moved to have discussion of Ordinance 20-1 included on the December 29, 2020 County Board Agenda. The motion was seconded by Daleiden and carried 5-0.
ADVISORY COMMITTEE/ADVISORY BOARD UPDATES
Wright County Soil & Water Conservation District. The SWCD met December 14 and Borrell attended. There was discussion that when the One Watershed One Plan initiative takes effect in a year or two whether Wright County would still need to continue its Water Management Task Force. Borrell suggested that anything that can be done to downsize government entities should be pursued.
Association of Minnesota Counties. The annual AMC conference was conducted virtually on December 7 and all commissioners attended. Daleiden said the circumstances of this year’s conference were unique in that everyone attended remotely. He said that the format didn’t allow for much interaction between county commissioners. Husom said the committees and voting on different issues were very different and she looks forward to next year, when the AMC conference can be conducted as is normally has been.
Mentoring Education and Drug Awareness (MEADA). Husom attended the meeting December 14. MEADA received a $125,000 federal grant over the next five years to increase its activities at area schools. There was Drug Take-Back Day conducted in Wright County and 105 pounds of medicines were turned in. She explained that the Veteran’s Administration in Alexandria pays for the destruction of meds twice a year. Husom added that there have been five overdose deaths in Wright County this year. Wright County Attorney Tom Kelly has served as the chair of MEADA for the last several years, but, with his retirement at the end of December, Husom will become the MEADA chair in 2021.
Public Works/Labor Management. Husom attended and said that, due to the lack of snow, Parks & Recreation employees have been able to do a considerable amount of trail work they wouldn’t ordinarily have been able to accomplish.
Health Services Advisory Committee. Husom attended the meeting. Minnesota Department of Health Commissioner Jan Malcolm gave a presentation on COVID-19 and plans to roll out the vaccine that has started making its way into Minnesota.
Highway 55 Corridor Coalition. The coalition met December 11 and Potter attended. Potter stepped down as the chairman of the coalition because he won’t be part of the organization in 2021. Husom was chosen to be Vice Chair of the coalition for 2021. He virtually attended the Washington D.C. fly-in and said that Vetsch will be replacing him on the Minnesota Transportation Alliance. He reiterated that the Minnesota Transportation Alliance has no connection to the Met Council, which has been a misconception he has heard many times over the years. Potter added that work that has been done to get the Highway 55 construction project from Plymouth to Loretto “shovel ready” to access state or federal funding when it becomes available. The next coalition meeting will be held April 9, 2021. Daleiden said that Potter has done a fantastic job for the residents of Wright County in representing them on transportation boards throughout his tenure as a commissioner. Husom said several state officials have recognized Potter for his efforts to get projects brought to Wright County and all of Minnesota.
Economic Stimulus Package. Lee Kelly said that an economic stimulus package for small businesses has passed both chambers of the Minnesota State Legislators and will be signed by the governor. The package includes funding for counties to assist small businesses and Wright County will be eligible for a minimum of $256,000 and will be similar to the CARES Act funds that sent federal dollars to counties.
The meeting adjourned at 10:37 a.m.
County Board Minutes submitted by John Holler, Communication Specialist
Published in the Herald Journal, Jan. 8, 2021.
WARRANTS FOR PUBLICATIONWarrants Approved On 11/25/2020 For Payment 11/25/2020
US BANK-PROCUREMENT CARDS 13,361.84
Final Total: 13,361.84
Warrants Approved On 11/25/2020 For Payment 11/25/2020
ABM BUILDING VALUE 13,218.63
BOARMAN KROOS VOGEL GROUP INC 50,401.25
CENTRAL MN MENTAL HEALTH CENTER INC 83,479.04
COKATO TOWNSHIP 19,264.21
CORINNA TOWNSHIP 17,124.89
FRANKLIN/LAVERNE M 7,940.00
FRONTIER PRECISION INC 5,411.12
FRSECURE LLC 10,212.50
HILLYARD INC - MINNEAPOLIS 2,167.90
INTEREUM INC 120,327.56
LOCKSTAR LOCKSMITH SERVICE 2,400.00
MIDDLEVILLE TOWNSHIP 24,921.31
MONTICELLO TOWNSHIP 13,479.28
MOTOROLA SOLUTIONS INC 16,583.51
WRIGHT HENNEPIN ELECTRIC 2,110.75
WRIGHT SWCD 3,320.40
27 Payments less than 2000 11,902.92
Final Total: 404,265.27
Warrants Approved On 11/30/2020 For Payment 11/30/2020
AMERICAN LEGION POST 145 20,000.00
EVELYN’S WINEBAR LLC 20,000.00
Final Total: 40,000.00

Warrants Approved On 11/30/2020 For Payment 11/30/2020
AAA STRIPING SERVICE INC 2,056.20
AMAZON BUSINESS 2,108.61
AVENU INSIGHTS & ANALYTICS LLC 6,121.36
BOLTON & MENK INC 12,672.32
CENTRAL MN JOBS & TRAINING SERVICES INC 9,510.00
HELMER INC 20,503.15
MARTIN MARIETTA MATERIALS 6,522.22
MID-MINNESOTA HOT MIX INC 11,440.45
SPRINT 2,555.15
WRIGHT HENNEPIN COOP ELEC ASSN 2,984.66
17 Payments less than 2000 7,974.03
Final Total: 84,448.15
Warrants Approved On 11/30/2020 For Payment 11/30/2020
DELL MARKETING LP 9,515.34
Final Total: 9,515.34
Warrants Approved On 11/30/2020 For Payment 11/30/2020
MAVERICK DRONE SYSTEMS 2,527.00
3 Payments less than 2000 360.50
Final Total: 2,887.50
Warrants Approved On 12/01/2020 For Payment 12/01/2020
ALBERTVILLE/CITY OF 2,224,011.33
ALBION TOWNSHIP 163,350.28
ANNANDALE/CITY OF 746,354.28
BUFFALO HRA 121,972.51
BUFFALO TOWNSHIP 237,943.57
BUFFALO/CITY OF 4,013,106.81
CHATHAM TOWNSHIP 129,141.80
CLEARWATER RIVER WATERSHED 210,771.02
CLEARWATER TOWNSHIP 213,365.88
CLEARWATER/CITY OF 570,548.39
COKATO TOWNSHIP 159,532.99
COKATO/CITY OF 675,177.71
CORINNA TOWNSHIP 502,792.27
DAYTON/CITY OF 18,704.75
DELANO/CITY OF 1,906,661.61
FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP 473,315.19
FRENCH LAKE TOWNSHIP 139,011.59
HANOVER EDA 17,209.46
HANOVER/CITY OF 666,163.57
HOWARD LAKE/CITY OF 715,410.19
INDIAN LAKE IMPROVEMENT DIST 8,274.52
LAKE JOHN IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT 8,486.03
MAPLE LAKE IMPROVEMENT DIST 19,884.88
MAPLE LAKE TOWNSHIP 287,355.98
MAPLE LAKE/CITY OF 673,922.98
MARYSVILLE TOWNSHIP 234,308.23
MIDDLEVILLE TOWNSHIP 122,001.77
MN STATE TREASURER-TIF 4,727.25
MONTICELLO TOWNSHIP 323,143.99
MONTICELLO/CITY OF 5,915,728.72
MONTROSE/CITY OF 735,789.19
OLD NATIONAL BANK 694,110.94
OTSEGO/CITY OF 3,754,947.92
PORT AUTHORITY 417,082.82
ROCKFORD TOWNSHIP 514,549.29
ROCKFORD/CITY OF 781,005.89
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 111 TR 95,143.62
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 2687 352,540.12
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 466 210,038.67
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 728 791,884.47
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 742 52,212.95
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 876 391,760.92
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 877 1,112,282.10
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 879 439,753.33
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 881 255,700.06
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 882 697,219.67
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 883 173,881.11
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 885 880,894.09
SILVER CREEK TOWNSHIP 366,861.02
SOUTH HAVEN/CITY OF 65,464.70
SOUTHSIDE TOWNSHIP 223,888.20
ST MICHAEL EDA 69,930.29
ST MICHAEL/CITY OF 3,665,587.67
STOCKHOLM TOWNSHIP 114,676.46
VICTOR TOWNSHIP 193,872.86
WAVERLY/CITY OF 575,933.52
WOODLAND TOWNSHIP 180,189.08
1 Payments less than 2000 167.94
Final Total: 39,309,748.45
Warrants Approved On 12/03/2020 For Payment 12/03/2020
BISON REAL ESTATE LLC 2,802.00
WINDSTREAM COMMUNICATIONS 3,606.00
24 Payments less than 2000 6,505.10
Final Total: 12,913.10
Warrants Approved On 12/03/2020 For Payment 12/03/2020
BEAUDRY PROPANE INC 2,207.90
GABRIEL/CATHLEEN 7,280.00
GERTKEN BROTHERS INC 3,878.01
HILLYARD INC - MINNEAPOLIS 2,410.16
M & H APPLIANCE SALES AND SERVICE 4,017.00
MN COUNTIES COMPUTER COOPERATIVE 31,928.78
SHORT ELLIOT HENDRICKSON, INC. 2,724.54
THOMSON REUTERS WEST PUBLISHING CORP 2,879.37
23 Payments less than 2000 12,059.56
Final Total: 69,385.32
Warrants Approved On 12/04/2020 For Payment 12/04/2020
BRAUN INTERTEC CORPORATION 3,996.50
CENTRA SOTA COOPERATIVE - BUFFALO 20,514.90
COMMISSIONER OF TRANSPORTATION 2,085.20
KRIS ENGINEERING INC 46,895.00
MCNAMARA INC/B 57,200.00
MIDWAY FORD 49,728.91
SUBURBAN TIRE WHOLESALE INC 5,677.00
TOWMASTER 113,674.91
15 Payments less than 2000 9,256.90
Final Total: 309,029.32
Warrants Approved On 12/08/2020 For Payment 12/08/2020
AGC NETWORKS INC 44,718.15
ALLINA HOSPITALS & CLINICS 5,454.00
ARAMARK SERVICES INC 7,763.42
BAKER TILLY VIRCHOW KRAUSE LLP 8,450.00
DELL MARKETING LP 12,565.00
EBSCO 4,814.63
FARM-RITE EQUIPMENT INC 4,200.00
FURTHER 2,556.20
GUARDIAN FLEET SAFETY LLC 2,408.03
I & S GROUP INC 2,750.00
MADDEN GALANTER HANSEN LLP 3,964.65
MARCO 20,880.90
MOTOROLA SOLUTIONS INC 262,827.00
MSB EXCAVATING & TILING LLC 4,392.50
ON-DEMAND SERVICES GROUP INC 15,200.00
PLAGGERMAN/MARGARET M 3,233.80
PRAIRIE LAKES YOUTH PROGRAMS 4,398.00
PRESBYTERIAN FAMILY FOUNDATION INC 2,985.06
PROCISE SOLUTIONS INC 5,000.00
RTVISION INC 7,386.10
SGI 13,860.00
STREICHERS 2,737.73
WOOD CHUCKERS FIREWOOD 5,940.00
46 Payments less than 2000 28,121.26
Final Total: 476,606.43
Published in the Herald Journal, Jan. 8, 2021.
Ordinance Amendment Number 20-1The County Board of Wright County Hereby Ordains:
Article I – Amendment to Chapter 155 Zoning
Sec. 1
§155.003 RULES AND DEFINITIONS
After § 155.03(B)(165) insert the following:
(165A) TREATMENT AND RECOVERY FACILITY means a use in which clients reside twenty-four hours per day under the care and supervision of a chemical dependency treatment or recovery program overseen by a staff member with a state-issued professional license in mental health or chemical dependency. The operator of the facility must be affiliated with a chemical dependency treatment provider licensed according to Minnesota Statutes, chapter 245G, or certified according to Minnesota Rules, parts 2960.045 to 2960.0490. Treatment and recovery facilities shall not include facilities that are also eligible for licensure or certification by the Minnesota Department of Corrections.
Sec. 2
§155.048 GENERAL AGRICULTURE (AG):
After § 155.048(D)(25) insert the following:
(26) Treatment and Recovery Facility
Sec. 3
PERFORMANCE STANDARDS
After § 155.110 insert the following:
§ 155.111 TREATMENT AND RECOVERY FACILITIES
(A) Treatment and recovery facilities. The following performance standards apply to all treatment and recovery uses:
(1) The facility shall be located on a parcel of land that includes at least 70 contiguous acres.
(2) The facility shall include at least 25,000 square feet of total floor area in one or more buildings that may be attached or detached and may contain residential structures such as dwelling units, rooming units, dormitory space. It may also include communal spaces such as a communal kitchen and dining, classrooms, offices, chapels, recreation space and similar areas. The number of residential structures may not exceed the number of residences on the land as allowed by the underlying zoning district but may include the number that would be allowed by transferring entitlements from contiguous property as defined in Section 155.048 of this chapter. For as long as the treatment and recovery use operate, there shall be no other residential buildings, nor subdivisions allowed on the land designated for the treatment and recovery use.
(3) Clients may reside twenty-four hours per day under the care and supervision of a chemical dependency treatment or recovery program. The program must be overseen by a staff member with a state-issued professional license in mental health or chemical dependency.
(4) The applicant shall submit a management plan for the facility and a floor plan showing sleeping areas, communal areas, emergency exits, bathrooms and staff living quarters.
(5) Parking requirements shall be included in the terms of the conditional use permit but shall not be less than four spaces for each building. All parking areas must comply with the performance standards for parking unless otherwise stated by the Planning Commission. Each residential building shall be accessible to emergency service vehicles by path or private road, but internal improved streets are not required.
Effective Date:
These ordinance amendments shall be effective upon passage and publication.
/s/ Christine Husom
Chair, Wright County Board of Commissioners
ATTEST:
/s/ Lee Kelly
Wright County Administrator
Published in the Herald Journal, Jan. 8, 2021.
Section 00 1113 Advertisement for Bids
Wright County Ditch No. 10
Wright County Drainage Authority
Cokato, Stockholm, Middleville & Victor Townships, Minnesota
ENGINEER PROJECT NO. 17-20449
General Notice
Wright County Drainage Authority (Owner) is requesting Bids for the construction of the following Project:
Wright County Ditch No. 10
ISG (the Engineer) Project No. 17-20449
Bids for the construction of the Project will be received by ISG (the Engineer) electronically through QuestCDN until January 22, 2021 at 2:00 PM local time. At that time the Bids received will be posted publicly online.
The project includes the following major quantities of Work:
1. Approximately 78,000 linear feet of open ditch cleaning.
1.2 Obtaining the Bidding Documents
Information and Bidding Documents for the Project can be found at the following designated website:
Quest Construction Data Network (QuestCDN)
www.questcdn.com
The QuestCDN eBidDoc number is 7462037. For assistance and free membership registration, contact QuestCDN at 952.233.1632 or info@questcdn.com.
Bidding Documents may be downloaded from the designated website. Prospective Bidders are urged to register with the designated website as a plan holder, even if Bidding Documents are obtained from a plan room or source other than the designated website in either electronic or paper format. The designated website will be updated periodically with addenda, lists of registered plan holders, reports, and other information relevant to submitting a Bid for the Project. All official notifications, addenda, and other Bidding Documents will be offered only through the designated website. Neither Owner nor Engineer will be responsible for Bidding Documents, including addenda, if any, obtained from sources other than the designated website.
Bidding Documents may only be purchased for download online at the designated website for a fee of $15.00.
The bidder must electronically submit the proposal online using the designated website. The bidder must pay an online bidding fee off $30.00.
A. Pre-bid Conference
A pre-bid conference call for the Project will be held on January 14, 2021 at 10:00 AM. Attendance at the pre-bid conference call is encouraged but not required.
Virtual Meeting Room: https://tinyurl.com/ycotkl77
Phone Number (612) 474-1960
Conference ID Number 829 027 475
B. Instructions to Bidders
For all further requirements regarding bid submittal, qualifications, procedures, and contract award, refer to the Instructions to Bidders that are included in the Bidding Documents.
This Advertisement is issued by:
By: Mark Origer, P.E.
Title: Civil Engineer
Date: December 30, 2020
Published in the Herald Journal, Jan. 8, 15 and 22, 2021.
ORDINANCE NO. 232OFFICIAL SUMMARYCITY OF MAYERCARVER COUNTY, MINNESOTADecember 28, 2020
The following is the official summary of Ordinance No. 232 of the City of Mayer adopted on December 28, 2020, pertaining to the establishment of certain fees and charges.
The City of Mayer has adopted a fee schedule that establishes a system of fees, charges, costs and rates for City licenses, permits, applications, information, services and other matters provided by the City.
The fee schedule is attached to and made part of Ordinance No. 232 adopted on December 28, 2020, and sets fees and charges for such categories as the following:
Administrative Fees, Amusement Devises, Assessment Searches, Building Permits, Planning and Zoning, Community Center Rental, Fire Department, Licenses, Meetings, Utilities, Public Works, Consultant Fees, Area Charges and Title Insurance Fee for Development.
The Fees and charges may be changed from time to time by Council action.
A PRINTED COPY OF THIS ENTIRE ORDINANCE IS AVAILABLE FOR INSPECTION AND REVIEW BY ANY PERSON AT THE OFFICE OF CITY HALL OF THE CITY OF MAYER LOCATED AT 413 BLUEJAY AVENUE, MAYER, MINNESOTA 55360.
Margaret McCallum, City Administrator
Published in the Herald Journal, Jan. 8, 2021.
ORDINANCE NO. 232OFFICIAL SUMMARYCITY OF MAYERCARVER COUNTY, MINNESOTADecember 28, 2020
The following is the official summary of Ordinance No. 232 of the City of Mayer adopted on December 28, 2020, pertaining to the establishment of certain fees and charges.
The City of Mayer has adopted a fee schedule that establishes a system of fees, charges, costs and rates for City licenses, permits, applications, information, services and other matters provided by the City.
The fee schedule is attached to and made part of Ordinance No. 232 adopted on December 28, 2020, and sets fees and charges for such categories as the following:
Administrative Fees, Amusement Devises, Assessment Searches, Building Permits, Planning and Zoning, Community Center Rental, Fire Department, Licenses, Meetings, Utilities, Public Works, Consultant Fees, Area Charges and Title Insurance Fee for Development.
The Fees and charges may be changed from time to time by Council action.
A PRINTED COPY OF THIS ENTIRE ORDINANCE IS AVAILABLE FOR INSPECTION AND REVIEW BY ANY PERSON AT THE OFFICE OF CITY HALL OF THE CITY OF MAYER LOCATED AT 413 BLUEJAY AVENUE, MAYER, MINNESOTA 55360.
Margaret McCallum, City Administrator
Published in the Herald Journal, Jan. 8, 2021.
CITY OF WINSTEDOFFICIAL SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE O-21-01
The intent and effect of this Ordinance is to amend CHAPTER 1, Section 6, OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE OF THE CITY OF WINSTED CONCERNING Fiscal Year 2021 Fee Schedule.
Publication of a summary (pursuant to Minnesota Statute §§ 412.191, SUBD. 4 and 331A.01, subd. 10) of an ordinance amending Chapter 1, section 6 of the municipal code of the city of winsted CONCERNING Fiscal Year 2021 Fee Schedule.
The following is the official summary of Ordinance No. O-21-01, which was passed by the City Council on January 5, 2021.
Ordinance No. O-21-01 allowing for the amendment of Chapter 1, Section 6 of Winsted’s Municipal Code, its ordinances and resolutions, amends section provisions as follows:
Chapter 1, Section 6 This section has been amended as it applies to the Fiscal Year 2021 Fee Schedule
The full text of Ordinance O-21-01 is available for inspection during regular office hours at the following locations: The office of City Clerk-Treasurer and the City’s website.
Published in the Herald Journal, Jan. 8, 2021.
CITY OF MAYERNotice of Hearing on Improvement
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
Notice is hereby given that the City Council of Mayer, MN will meet in the council chambers of the City Hall Via Zoom Meeting, 413 Bluejay Avenue, Mayer, MN 55360 at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, January 25, 2021, to consider the making of the 2021 Street Reconstruction Project, an improvement on 3rd Street and 5th Street, by street, drainage, and municipal utility improvements, pursuant to Minn. Stat. §§ 429.011 to 429.111. Zoom meeting information can be found within the Council Meeting Notice for the 1-25-2021 meeting located on the City website under “Notices” (https://www.cityofmayer.com). The estimated cost of the improvement project is $1,486,239. A reasonable estimate of the impact of the assessment along with the methodology used to calculate individual assessments will be available at the hearing. Such persons as desire to be heard with reference to the proposed improvement will be heard at this meeting.
Margaret McCallum, City Administrator
Published in the Herald Journal, Jan. 8 and 15, 2021.