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Herald Journal Legal Notices
New public notices published in the issue of July 2, 2021

BOARD MINUTESBOARD OF WRIGHTCOUNTY COMMISSIONERSJune 15, 2021DATE APPROVED: June 22, 2021
The Wright County Board met in regular session at 9:00 A.M. with Husom, Vetsch, Daleiden, Wetter, and Kaczmarek present.
COUNTY BOARD MINUTES 6-1-21 MEETING
Husom moved to approve the minutes from 6-1-21. The motion was seconded by Wetter and carried 5-0.
AGENDA
Vetsch moved to approve the Agenda. The motion was seconded by Kaczmarek and carried 5-0.
CONSENT AGENDA
Husom requested to pull Item A1 (Administration) and Kaczmarek requested to pull Item E1A (Planning & Zoning) for discussion and clarification.
Husom moved to approve the Consent Agenda with the removal of Items A1 (Administration) and E1A (Planning & Zoning). The motion was seconded by Kaczmarek and carried 5-0.
* Items A1 and E1A for discussion.
A. ADMINISTRATION
1. *Authorize extending the Lease Agreement with the State of Minnesota, Department of Military Affairs, to allow the National Guard use of the “Old Jail” area for training
2. Request approval and authorization of signature of a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) to allow AFSCME members and non-union employees to donate accrued Vacation time to Eligibility Specialist Whitney Moran
3. Approve Charitable Gambling Application, Form LG220 Autism Society of Minnesota, gambling premises: V by HH, 66 Maple Avenue N, Maple Lake, MN 55358, date of activity: June 27, 2021
B. ADMINISTRATION - FINANCE
1. Authorization for annual delegation of wire transfers as required by Minnesota Statute 471.38
2. Approve transfer of $338,052 from Fund 01-100 General Fund to 20-393 SCORE Fund: 01-100-000-0000-6910 transfer out $338,052. 0-393-000-0000-5910 transfer in $338,052
3. Approve renewal of annual On-Sale, Off-Sale, including Sunday Sales Liquor License for Two Friends of Annandale, Inc. DBA Hitching Post at Lake Center for license period July 1, 2021 to June 30, 2022
4. Approve renewal of annual On-Sale including Sunday Sales Liquor License for Normwayside, Inc. DBA Norm’s Wayside for the license period July 1, 2021 to June 30, 2022 contingent upon approval form the Wright County Sheriff, Wright County Attorney’s Office and Rockford Town Board
5. Approve renewal of annual On-Sale Liquor License for Cokato Town & Country Club for the license period July 1, 2021 to June 30, 2022 contingent upon approval from the Wright County Sheriff’s Officed and Wright County Attorney’s Office
6. Approve renewal of annual Off-Sale 3.2 Malt Liquor License for David Olson DBA Olson’s Truck Stop for the license period July 1, 2021 to June 30, 2022 contingent upon approval from the Wright County Sheriff’s Office, Wright County Attorney’s Office and Silver Creek Town Board
7. Approve a temporary Liquor License for the Church of St. Mary of Czestochowa for an event on July 17, 2021
8. Acknowledge Warrants Issued between May 26, 2021 and June 8, 2021 (See below, Item IX. Warrant Listing)
C. AG & DRAINAGE
1. Approval of Payment Application #3 of $52,414.71 to Blackstone Contractors, LLC for County Ditch #10
D. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
1. Position Replacement: Office 365 Program Architect
E. PLANNING & ZONING
1. Accept the Findings and Recommendations of the Planning Commission for the following requests to rezone:
A. *Donovan L. DesMarais – (Chatham Township) – Commission unanimously recommends approval of the request to rezone from AG General Agriculture and S – 2 Residential – Recreational Shorelands to A/R Agricultural – Residential and S – 2
B. James Feehan – (Monticello Township) – Commission unanimously recommends approval of the request to rezone approximately 50 Acres from AG General Agriculture to A/R Agricultural – Residential
C. Robert I. Gruys – (Corinna Township) – Commission unanimously recommends approval of the request to rezone approximately 13 Acres from AG General Agriculture and S – 2 Residential – Recreational Shorelands to R – 2 Suburban – Residential and S – 2
D. Chris A. Lantto – (French Lake Township) – Commission unanimously recommends approval of the request to rezone approximately 1.5 Acres from R – 1 Urban – Rural Transitional to B – 1 Highway Business
ITEMS PULLED FROM CONSENT AGENDA TO BE DISCUSSED
A. ADMINISTRATION
1. Authorize extending the Lease Agreement with the State of Minnesota, Department of Military Affairs, to allow the National Guard use of the “Old Jail” area for training
Husom stated the lease term is three years, ending in 2024. However, the county anticipates vacating the property in January 2022. If the county still owns the building, the National Guard could potentially still use it. The lease language allows termination provided there is a 60-day written notice.
Kaczmarek questioned how often the building is being used and in what capacity. Sheriff’s Office, Captain Patrick O’Malley said the National Guard in Monticello had their classification changed from Military Police Unit to Corrections Officers. The old jail facility has a similar setup to places the National Guard sends the corrections officers. The arrangement was made for them to use a couple of the housing units that were empty for training purposes. They use the building for training once a month, usually in the late afternoon/early evening, and two weeks in the summer. The National Guard gets the keys for the old jail from the Sheriff’s Office, they clean up after training and bring the keys back. County Administrator Lee Kelly said there have not been any issues.
Husom moved to approve Item A1 under the Consent Agenda. The motion was seconded by Vetsch and carried 5-0.
E. PLANNING & ZONING
1. Accept the Findings and Recommendations of the Planning Commission for the following request to rezone:
A. Donovan L. DesMarais – (Chatham Township) – Commission unanimously recommends approval of the request to rezone from AG General Agriculture and S – 2 Residential – Recreational Shorelands to A/R Agricultural – Residential and S – 2
Kaczmarek asked Planning and Zoning Director Sean Riley to provide a summary from the Planning Commission meeting regarding the request to rezone. Riley said the property in question made an application to rezone from general agricultural to residential, with a minimum of 10-acre lots. The property is in the land use plan guided for development in that zoning classification. As part of the process, the applicant must meet with the township for a recommendation. The Planning Commission did a site inspection on the property. The Planning Commission recommended to approve the rezoning from AG to A/R for four lots. If the board approves this item, it will then go back to the Planning Commission for review of the subdivision.
Kaczmarek said the Planning Commission received a written response from Chatham, disapproving the request because of increased traffic and road maintenance. The Planning Commission gave both Chatham Township and Marysville Township opportunity to give feedback during the meeting, however none was given. There is a history of rezoning in the same neighborhood within Chatham Township. Kaczmarek stated he supports the decision that was made.
Husom said she will be voting with Chatham Township on this Item.
Kaczmarek moved to approve Item E1A under the Consent Agenda. The motion was seconded by Vetsch and carried 4-1 with, Husom voting against it.
TIMED AGENDA ITEMS
ADMINISTRATION – FINANCE, LINDSEY MEYER
Approve Application of Laestadian Lutheran Church for Large Group Assembly Permit for event on June 28, 2021 through July 7, 2021
Meyer stated the application was not submitted 60-days prior to the event as required by ordinance, therefore it is being presented before the commissioners.
Assistant County Attorney Brian Asleson said Laestadian Lutheran Church was originally not planning on having the event this year. The Church decided to do a more localized, smaller event this year. The last time the church held the event, several requirements were waived, but they were required to have an ambulance on site. The application is very similar to the last application and the church has requested the same waivers.
Bruce Herrala, Laestadian Lutheran Church said the difference between this year’s event and the one in 2019 is the church is hosting rather than the broader LLC organization. This permit will enable members to camp at the adjacent Silver Springs property.
Vetsch moved to approve the application of Laestadian Lutheran Church for a Large Group Assembly Permit on June 28, 2021 through July 7, 2022. The motion was seconded by Husom and carried 5-0.
SHERIFF’S OFFICE, BRIAN JOHNSON
Resolution to Accept the 2021 State of Minnesota Annual Boat & Water Safety Grant in the amount of $19,108
Johnson said the Sheriff’s Office has been participating in this grant for many years. It is one of three annual boat and water grants. This grant is primarily used to supplement the full-time boat and water deputy’s salary.
Kaczmarek questioned if the grant covered regular wages or if overtime applied. Johnson said it is strictly for regular wages. Once the $19,108 is exhausted, the Sheriff’s Office pays the remainder of the salary. Kaczmarek asked if equipment can be purchased using the grant. Johnson said it could, but the Sheriff’s Office has historically used the boat and water equipment grant for equipment needs. No match is required for this grant.
Vetsch moved to accept the 2021 State of Minnesota Annual Boat & Water Safety Grant in the amount of $19,108. The motion was seconded by Kaczmarek and carried 5-0 on a roll call vote.
SHERIFF’S OFFICE, PATRICK O’MALLEY
Requesting Approval and Signatures for a Three-Year Extension of the Jail Food Service Contract with Aramark
O’Malley said there will be no price increase the first year of the contract. The second and third years will have an increase of 2.5 percent and 3 percent respectively. This contract covers the purchase of food and the labor to prepare it.
Kaczmarek questioned if Aramark would be interested in providing food to employees at the Justice Center. O’Malley said he has spoken with Aramark and they are interested and are willing to partner with the county.
Husom moved to approve a three-year extension of the Jail Food Service Contract with Aramark. The motion was seconded by Wetter and carried 5-0.
EXTENSION, ADAM AUSTING
Adopt a Resolution Proclaiming the Spike Family as the Wright County 2021 Farm Family of the Year
The Farm Family recognition program has existed for over 30 years. It honors farm families and their contributions to agricultural industry and their local communities.
Austing introduced the Wright County 2021 Farm Family of the Year. The Spike family is three generations actively contributing to the farm, raising beef and pork. The family also grows corn, soybeans and hay. The Spike family started farming in 1973 and in 1974 the dairy operation expanded. Much of their business is done through relationships with local consumers and local butcher shops. The Spike family deals with difficulties that other farmers also deal with in growing urban areas. They have good relationships and communicate with neighbors which helps them overcome those challenges.
The Spike Family was presented a plaque.
Vetsch moved to proclaim the Spike Family as the Wright County 2021 Farm Family of the Year. The motion was seconded by Wetter and carried 5-0 on a roll call vote.
ITEMS FOR CONSIDERATION
ADMINISTRATION
Cancel County Board Meeting in August and November due to Five Tuesdays in the Month
Kelly said in August discussions will start regarding budgets. Typically, the default is canceling the last board meeting of the month. Husom suggested canceling August 3, 2021. Vetsch said it would be hard not having a board meeting for two weeks in a row and asked if they could switch August 10, 2021 to a board meeting and forgo the workshop scheduled for that day.
Husom moved to cancel the County Board meeting on August 3, 2021 due to five Tuesdays in the month. The motion was seconded by Vetsch and carried 5-0.
Husom moved to set a board meeting for August 10, 2021 and potentially postpone the workshop to the following week. The motion was seconded by Wetter and carried 5-0.
Kelly suggested canceling November 30, 2021 or November 23, 2021. Husom said there is an Association of Minnesota Counties (AMC) meeting the second week in November, so she suggested canceling November 23, 2021.
Husom moved to cancel the County Board meeting on November 23, 2021 due to five Tuesdays in the month. The motion was seconded by Vetsch and carried 5-0.
Department Budget Review: 450 Public Health
Health and Human Services Director Jami Goodrum Schwartz said while preparing the budget for 2020 no one knew what the next year had in store. The most impacted division in Health and Human Services department was Public Health.
Kaczmarek said Software and System Support was budgeted at $37,700 and $56,482.69 spent. Health and Human Services Fiscal Supervisor, Kate Dahl said the annual Nurse Family Partnership Support Fee budgeted under object code 6235 which is publications and brochures which was incorrect. When the invoice was paid on July 17, 2020 under the correct object code 6260 which was aligned with the next budget period of 2021.
Kaczmarek asked for more information regarding Program 453 Dental Initiative – Dental Coordinator. He questioned if the person would have a role when the Dental Clinic opens and if the $100,000 grant will pay the position’s salary. Health and Human Services Public Health Director, Sarah Grosshuesch explained the Dental Initiative is separate from the Dental Clinic. Blue Cross/Blue Shield funds several coordinators in multiple regions of state. The Health and Human Services Directors in the 7W Region, which include Wright, Sherburne, Benton, and Sterns County, decided Wright County would be the best fit to have that position which serves the four counties. The grant does cover the entire salary.
Grosshuesch said there is not much leftover after paying the Dental Coordinator’s salary. With the yearly contract, if this position isn’t renewed the person with the least seniority would potentially lose their job.
Assistant Finance Director, Heather Lemieux provided an update on Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP). During the process of building the ERP, the implementation/business team decided it would not allow line items to go over budget. This system will not allow it to happen, budget amendments will have to be done instead.
COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE MEETING MINUTES 6-1-21
Vetsch moved to accept the Committee of the Whole meeting minutes from 6-1-21. The motion was seconded by Kaczmarek and carried 5-0.
Vetsch moved to extend the ABM contract until April 2022 and accept bids for subsequent years in the first quarter of 2022. The motion was seconded by Husom and carried 5-0.
Kaczmarek moved to approve the changes to the commissioner’s space in the new Government Center. The motion was seconded by Husom, motion denied 3-2.
I. BUFFALO CLINIC MEMORIAL
Dr. Andrew Burgdorf, Physician Lead for Allina Health Crossroads Clinic in Buffalo, made a presentation concerning concept work that has been done on the creation of a bronze memorial stemming from the Feb. 9 shootings at the clinic. Burgdorf said discussions of a memorial have focused not on the trauma or criminality of the event, but the community coming together in response to the tragedy. He said if a memorial is to be done, it shouldn’t be at the clinic itself, but rather in a prominent location, such as a county facility. Burgdorf said he met with Wes Jones, a Wright County resident who specializes in bronze artwork. Jones mocked up a sculpture of a nearly five-foot wingspan peace crane at a cost of approximately $10,000 – as well as a smaller version that would be less expensive.
Husom said getting firm cost estimates could help guide the decision of how to proceed. She added the Government Center could be a location option given the amount of daily foot traffic in the building. Husom added that bronze plates memorializing those involved in the heroic events of that day that could be included at the base of the sculpture. Vetsch asked if the county is being asked for space to house the sculpture or to pay the costs. Burgdorf said the project would be a generational piece that would be permanently placed in a fixed location, adding that Allina would be handing off the project so it can get back to providing health care.
Husom said the next step would be to reach out to Jones to provide concept design plans. Vetsch asked where the City of Buffalo was in this process. Husom said she hasn’t spoken with city officials about a potential partnership. Burgdorf said Allina would not be able to fund the project. Vetsch said the memorial is a great idea, but he believes the City of Buffalo should take the lead because, from the county perspective, if funds are allocated for one municipality it could open the door for other municipalities to expect similar funding for potential future memorial projects. He added that, while the county could be a partner to some extent, whether it be providing a location or some funding, the City of Buffalo should be the driver on the project.
RECOMMENDATION: Authorize Husom to reach out to Buffalo Mayor Teri Lachermeier to gauge the willingness of the city to take the lead on the Allina clinic memorial project moving forward and come back to the county board with details of those conversations.
II. ABM INDUSTRIES CONTRACT DISCUSSION
County Administrator Lee Kelly provided background on the cleaning services contract with ABM Industries for county facilities and introduced ABM Senior District Manager Jeremy Greening to the board if the commissioners had specific questions. Kaczmarek asked if it is typical procedure for a large contract ($625,000 annually) to come up for board review after it has expired. Kelly stated the three-year contract expired in April 2021, a revised contract was presented in late-April and the signing of the contract was delayed awaiting discussions the board had brought up about the proposed revised contract in May. Kelly said typical procurement contracts don’t always come before the board but given the size of the contract and that the contract had expired, it required board approval.
Kaczmarek pointed out that the contract lists several county facilities, but does not include the Compost & Recycling Center and the Sheriff’s Office Training Center (SOTC). He asked how those buildings are being cleaned. Daleiden said the Compost & Recycling Center doesn’t need to be professionally cleaned because there are only two employees on site, and they clean up their workspaces themselves. Kile said county maintenance staff goes to the SOTC at least once a week and county staff does the work because of the security requirements the FBI has in place at the facility. Kile added that the facility is being used much more often than initially anticipated. Kaczmarek asked if the job classifications of county maintenance employees cleaning the SOTC are viewed differently than cleaning work at other county facilities. Human Resources Director Schawn Johnson said most job descriptions include “other duties as assigned by a supervisor” verbiage and that the cleaning of the SOTC by county maintenance staff falls under job description language.
Kaczmarek said the contract contains language about criminal background checks of ABM employees and asked Greening about that process. Greening said ABM’s Human Resources division handles all background checks and drug screenings, adding that more thorough background checks are done for AMB employees working in the jail and Justice Center. Kaczmarek asked about the difference in cleaning an office that is locked as opposed to one that is unlocked. Greening said ABM employees do not enter a locked office – when waste collects in a locked office, trash cans are placed outside the locked office and disposed of or completed through special request in an existing scheduling system. Kile said maintenance staff does monthly walk-throughs of all county facilities to address issues as they arise.
Kaczmarek stated that when the county initially contracted with ABM, it was determined that there was a savings of approximately $250,000 over the projection of paying in-house staff, adding that the initial contract was approximately $200,000 less than is currently being paid. Husom said one of the primary reasons for the change is there is much more square footage now that the Justice Center has opened. She added that, when the county moves into the new Government Center, the existing Government Center and the Human Services Center will no longer be part of the contract. Vetsch said if the county was to get rid of the ABM contract, it would require the hiring of 6.5 full-time employees at a cost of approximately $425,000 with wages and benefits. Equipment and supplies would increase $50,000-$75,000. Vetsch added that the primary difference in contracting the work is the elimination of county liability, which could be much more costly to the county. The contracting option factoring in the reduction of risk to the county makes that option more attractive. Kelly said the current extension of the contract runs through April 2022, by which time all county operations will be on a single campus, adding that the increase in cost is related to the addition of the Justice Center to the contract.
Kaczmarek asked whether a contract of this size should be put out for bid. Daleiden said that, by April 2022, there will be a much better handle on the amount of work that is required to clean county facilities and the contract will go out for bids at that time.
RECOMMENDATION: No action taken.
III. COMMISSIONER SPACE IN NEW GOVERNMENT CENTER
Daleiden stated that Kaczmarek had expressed a concern about commissioner safety in their offices in the new Government Center but reminded the commissioners that the new commissioner offices will be beyond a secured area and will require an employee badge with access permissions to enter that area. Kaczmarek said when he toured the facility, he came up with what he felt were reasonable and practical changes that could be made. His proposal was to have a glass window alongside the commissioner office doors so a commissioner can clearly see who is standing outside a closed door of a commissioner office. Kelly said if this change would be made, it should be made to all offices or none – not a “one-off” request for a single commissioner. Kelly added it is possible to be done but would require a change order.
Daleiden said that, since it’s behind a secured area, it doesn’t seem like it is necessary. Vetsch said he would like to have uniformity. Kaczmarek said the proposed changes would provide additional safety for commissioners. Daleiden said if all the commissioner offices were subject to a change order, the additional cost would be $14,000-15,000. Kryzer said there are different styles of glass in different locations of the Justice Center, but all areas within specific offices are the same for the sake of aesthetic consistency. Kaczmarek said if two commissioners want a different door/window style, that should be their ability to do so. The consensus was that, if changes to the doors are to be made, now is the time to do it and the changes should be made to all offices, not just one or two.
RECOMMENDATION: Authorize a change order to alter the style of the door construction for county commissioner offices in the new Government Center.
IV. AMERICAN RESCUE PLAN ACT
The committee was presented a PowerPoint presentation detailing an overview of the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA). Wright County was awarded $26,878,110 in ARPA funds - $13,439,055 has been received and the other $13,439,055 will be received in 2022. There were four funding buckets of eligible uses identified for the funds:
• Responding to the Public Health Emergency
• Addressing Negative Economic Impacts
• Serving the Hardest Hit
• Improving Access to Infrastructure
Finance Director Lindsey Meyer said that Wright County has no revenue loss for 2020, but the ARPA rules haven’t be finalized and the figures can be recalculated annually for 2021, 2022 and 2023 – which will include a potential increase in inflation rates. Lost revenue areas would include building new infrastructure (including roads), maintenance of existing infrastructure, cybersecurity, health services, education services and police/public safety services. Because the final guidance has not been completed, Meyer said she isn’t confident in giving a recommendation about lost revenue expenses at this time. Ineligible uses would include offsetting a tax cut, deposit in pension funds, bolstering rainy day reserves or debt service payments.
The board was presented with a breakdown of the four funding buckets, their eligible uses, some funding estimates associated with those uses and ideas that have been presented by county staff under sub-headings in the four primary funding buckets.
Responding to the Public Health Emergency – Under “COVID-19 Mitigation,” potential uses include pandemic unknown costs, a large programmable sign for future vaccine clinics and secure drop boxes in each district. Under “Behavioral Health Care,” potential uses include mental health support by expanding outreach program and integrated services, as well as transportation for residents experiencing mental health crisis. Public Health Director Sarah Grosshuesch and Social Services Manager Jill Pooler both detailed some of the prospective uses of funds in both mitigation and behavioral health care and discussed specific issues tied into several of the items listed as ideas generated by county staff for the use of funds.
Addressing Negative Economic Impacts – Under “Workers and Families,” some potential uses include vocational training at Wright Tech Center, the creation and expansion of accredited programs for youths/adults, assisting Central Minnesota Jobs and Training, offering training/educational grants, expand energy assistance, creating Trailblazer Transit routes to and from the Government Center and the expansion of Safe Families program. Under “Small Businesses,” some potential uses include providing funding to the Wright County Economic Development Partnership, another round of small business relief funding, business counseling and technical assistance. Under “Public Sector,” potential uses include Health & Human Services customer relations management (including single client I.D. numbers to improve service delivery) and the purchase of body cameras for the Wright County Sheriff’s Office. Meyer said the purchase of body cameras may have to come off the list if the county doesn’t display any lost revenues. Health & Human Services Business Manager Christine Partlow explained the improvement in the delivery of service that could be provided by the single client ID number system, whether as a stand-alone project for Wright County or a collaborative project between multiple counties.
Serving the Hardest Hit – Under “Housing and Neighborhoods,” some potential uses include increasing workforce housing for low-income individuals to sustain housing while working or attempting to find work (a collaboration with the Initiative Foundation/7W counties) and transitional housing. Under “Educational Disparity,” some potential uses include providing assistance to Wright County school districts and social/economic learning resources for area schools. Under “Healthy Environments,” some potential uses include grant funding for expansion of childcare services and supplementing childcare assistance programs. Vetsch said that if $1.5 million was allocated to school districts it would translate to a funding amount of $45,000 to each of the 11 school districts that serve children in Wright County for the next three years.
Improving Access to Infrastructure – Under “Water and Sewer,” some potential uses include matching grants for city water projects. Under “Broadband,” it has already been discussed that up to $10 million will be allocated to improve broadband service to portions of the county that are currently underserved and work in conjunction with ISB providers. Daleiden expressed concern that the $3 million the has been floated out as a funding option for city water projects could be exhausted very quickly because of the expense involved with such projects. Daleiden also said that the expansion of broadband in underserved areas of the county or single-provider areas could create competition among ISB providers, which would benefit consumers. Projects Administrator Elizabeth Karels said that a Request for Proposal was sent out for consulting firms to conduct a broadband feasibility study.
RECOMMENDATION: Continue the discussion of how to proceed with the administration of the American Rescue Plan Act to 1 p.m. Tuesday, June 8
COUNTY BOARD WORKSHOP MEETING MINUTES 6-8-21
Kaczmarek moved to accept the County Board Workshop Meeting minutes and recommendations from 6-8-21. The motion was seconded by Vetsch and carried 5-0.
Asleson requested corrections be made under Charlotte/Martha Subordinate Service District. The shortfall should be $400,000 rather than $40,000. Additionally, the unexpected bill was due to eminent domain. He also requested the addition that repairs on the main lines will be at county cost.
Vetsch stated he has concerns about agreements that “live” within minutes, sometimes those agreements get lost. He suggests having a legal agreement signed between the city and county because he doesn’t want the county to be tied to a “contract” in the minutes that haven’t been negotiated. Daleiden said this should be discussed in the public hearing because it shouldn’t be on the county’s dime. It should be paid by those who benefit from it, just like a county ditch.
I. Health Partners Clinic Discussion
Elizabeth Tobias, Health Partners, went over the presentation/handouts that were given to the board regarding the Well @ Work on-site Health Partners Clinic which will be located in the new Government Center. The presentation included the layout of the clinic, services and capabilities, medical supply storage, lobby waiting room, and exam room. She discussed the feasibility analysis and explained that some businesses use utilization incentives to get their employees to use the clinic.
Daleiden asked how many staff will be on-site. Tobias said there will be one Clinician on-site three days a week. It will either be a Nurse Practitioner or a Physician’s Assistant. Vetsch asked what the timeframe for opening the clinic would be, at the ribbon cutting or a later date? Tobias explained due to the logistics of opening a new county building the Health Partners Clinic would be opened around April 2022.
Wetter asked for clarification as to where labs get sent to and how long it will take to get the results. Nicole Goenner, Health Partners, explained that the Well @ Work Clinic will follow the same process as all other Health Partners Clinics. Near the end of the clinic day a carrier will pick up all lab specimens and bring them to Health Partners Central Laboratory. However, any pathology specimens would then go to Regions Hospital to be processed. The labs will start being processed the same evening. Any patient that is signed up for online patient services could start seeing results the same day, the majority of the results will be back within 24 hours. If it is something that takes longer to process or grow, it could potentially be longer. Goenner stated there are some specimens that can be processed on-site such as a strep test, a pregnancy test, or a urine test. The clinic will have some on-site generic antibiotic medications that patients will be able to leave the clinic with, if needed.
Vetsch said if the County incentivizes employees to use the clinic and there is a control point on claims costs it will help with renewal premiums the following year and that is where the savings truly come into play.
Kaczmarek said about 1,500 square feet is set aside in the new Government Center for the clinic. He asked what the construction cost would be to get the clinic setup the way it needs to be. Facilities Director Alan Wilczek said the county is not outfitting the clinic with much, it’s just the structure itself. Kaczmarek asked for the amount it’s going to cost to outfit the clinic. Daleiden explained to Kaczmarek that the county is not providing anything except the space. Vetsch added that the county stands to save hundreds of thousands of dollars on potential health insurance renewals by being able to control cost factors for services.
Kaczmarek asked what the $315,000 entails for running the clinic. Tobias explained the biggest cost is the Clinician which is a salaried position with benefits. There is malpractice insurance covered under a monthly administrative fee that Health Partners charges. The administrative fee also covers the people managing the medical oversight with the Medical Director, medications, labs, supplies, flu shots and anything else needed to provide care.
Kaczmarek asked how Health Partners was selected as the provider for this clinic. Vetsch explained that Health Partners is one of the companies that has been doing this type of clinic the longest. Daleiden added that Health Partners is also the county’s insurance provider. Daleiden said he’s sees this as a benefit and savings to employees, maybe not tomorrow or even next year but sometime in the future.
Wetter asked what the clinic hours will be because a lot Urgent Care and Emergency Room visits are after normal business hours. Goenner said they work with the county to see what the best fit for the county will be. Some of these types of clinic open at 6 a.m. and close at 6 p.m. very few are open 8 a.m. and close at 4:30 p.m. Well @ Work Clinic’s provide access during the day and try to provide care outside of those traditional times. Vetsch said there are 24 hours a week of appointment times based on the $315,000.
Kaczmarek wanted to know how many employees live in Wright County that would be paying taxes to contribute to offset the cost that is not covered by usage. Vetsch asked Kaczmarek what the correlation of the number would show. Human Resources Director Schawn Johnson said there are roughly 750 employees in Wright County and approximately 400 live in Wright County. 99 percent of the Wright County employees are in-network which means they use Health Partners. Tobias added that the analysis only looked at employees and not their dependents and spouses so the numbers would most likely go up regarding utilization of the clinic.
Kaczmarek wanted to go on record saying, looking at the potential cost for the taxpayers, the speculation of usage, the availability of existing services in the area and the feedback he has received from his constituents, that he does not support moving forward with the Well @ Work Clinic and he would make a motion. Daleiden reminded Kaczmarek that the Board doesn’t make motions at workshops. Vetsch interjected saying there is already a contract for three years with Health Partners for the Well @ Work Clinic.
Kaczmarek wanted to know if an employee puts in a request for time off for appointments are supervisors going to steer them to the Well @ Work Clinic. Vetsch said by law the county cannot tell employees where to get medical care.
RECOMMENDATION: Informational only.
II. Charlotte/Martha Subordinate Service District
Assistant County Attorney Brian Asleson reviewed the minutes from the last Charlotte/Martha Subordinate Service District Advisory Committee Meeting. This district was formed in 2001 and the sewer project came, in 2002. The City of St. Michael reached out because there were issues with the failing septic systems. The reason the Charlotte/Martha district was formed was because the south half of Lake Charlotte and all of Lake Martha are in the township and not in a city that has sewer capabilities. The county adopted a role of services charges on the parcels that are hooking up to the project. There is a shortfall in the fund which is used to make bond payments. Asleson said he believed the shortfall was around $400,000, with the last bond payment being due in 2022.
The Advisory Committee was formed in 2019. The original recommendation was a $3,000 assessment to each of the parcels that are either hooked up to the sewer or had a stub that could be hooked up in the future. The $3,000 assessment was going to be spread out over a three-year period with no interest which would result in a little overage. There has been discussion about using the overage for future repairs to the system. People who use the system pay a monthly or quarterly fee to the City of St. Michael which covers the service they get and grinder pumps on parcels that have gone out. The lines on the street are owned by the county which is why staff thought a maintenance fund would be a good idea. Any repairs on those main lines will be at county cost.
One option would be a one-year assessment in the amount of $2,511 that would be paid once. The second option would be an assessment of $2,854 spread out over three years. Both of those options would require a public hearing before the County Board. The Advisory Committee decided it doesn’t want to set up a maintenance fund at this point.
Daleiden said he was of the understanding there were two reasons for the shortfall. One reason was people paid it off right away which caused a lack of interest collected. The second reason was some development never occurred that was expected. Asleson said there were probably a few other reasons too. There was an unexpected bill in the amount of almost $70,000 paid by the city because of eminent domain. Also, interest rates plummeted in 2008. It was refinanced in 2011 and the savings were passed on to the residents.
Kaczmarek wanted to know how the amount of the assessments was determined. Asleson said the base cost is the same for everyone the only factor is how far residents live from the road. Auditor/Treasurer Bob Hiivala said he would recommend assessing 40 basis points which is the short-term interest rate, so the assessment amounts can be fixed. Vetsch said it should be high enough that it would cover it. Finance Director Lindsey Meyer said without knowing what is going to happen and depending on how the residents are going to pay it back, will depend on how much money they are borrowing for this year, next year, the year after that and what the interest rates are because the County need to recoup the costs.
RECOMMENDATION: The Board recommends setting a meeting after getting preliminary numbers for the assessment. After that a public hearing will be set up and a final decision will then be made.
II. 2022 Budget
Hiivala gave the Board information for the projected 2022 budget. Vetsch said he has concerns with the numbers Hiivala has for the 2022 budget. Vetsch said he would like to wait to discuss the budget until the numbers are more accurate because he doesn’t want anyone to latch on to these numbers.
Hiivala asked Vetsch if he was concerned that the 2021 tax rate was incorrect. Vetsch said he was concerned and couldn’t figure out where Hiivala came up with that rate. Hiivala asked Assistant Finance Director-Property Tax Operations Tammi Vaith what the tax rate for payable 2021 was. Vaith said the tax rate for payable 2021 was 43.719.
Vetsch apologized to Hiivala for not being able to sit down beforehand and look at the numbers but he was booked with meetings the previous week. County Administrator Lee Kelly said they have been gathering information but there are still a lot of variables in play for 2022 that have not been defined yet.
Vetsch said there’s some missing information on the revenue side that is inflating the taxes. It needs to be figured out, so the numbers are fairly accurate. Daleiden said he would like this information ahead of time so when the board decides what meeting to discuss it at, board members can review it beforehand.
RECOMMENDATION: Vetsch will meet with Hiivala, Meyer and Vaith to go over the numbers and estimates to ensure accuracy before the next meeting.
IV. Compost Facility follow-up from May Workshop
Wilczek said at the last workshop the Board asked him to get proposals for engineering services. Wilczek reached out to engineering consultant TKDA for the structural aspect. TKDA was the engineer for the original construction project for both the structural and civil side. TKDA gave a proposal to do a review of the hangar building for the current condition and for the potential option to enclose the hangar to make it a drive-thru. The proposal included the structural condition assessment reporting the potential feasibility for $8,000.
For the civil side of the project, Wilczek reached out to Wenck, which is part of Stantec-the county’s civil engineer on all the county’s construction projects over the past several years. Wenck looked at the site and put together a proposal for the civil side and on the 29.3 acres to do a constraints analysis to find out limitations on the site from a retention basin runoff and a filtration area. There are a lot of components to the trash and compost site. Wenck proposed doing constraints analysis as well as a schematic layout for the fire training center that was discussed at the last workshop. Wenck would determine general turn radius for trucks, what size site would fit in the area and still be able to keep the traffic flow. The proposal came back at $5,000 from Wenck.
Wilczek said if the board wants to go beyond that there can be site analysis done such as ground boring and environmental testing/analysis. There would be another proposal at that point.
Wilczek said he would support moving forward with Wenck if the Board is still interested in moving forward with the site analysis and TKDA to do the structural analysis of the hangar building.
Daleiden asked if Wenck could do the structural analysis of the hangar building. Wilczek said he didn’t believe they specialize in doing structural analysis. He also said TKDA would be a good firm to go with because they originally designed the structure.
Kaczmarek asked about the current building at the compost site. Daleiden said if the hangar can be enclosed the other building can be eliminated altogether.
Kaczmarek said he did some research and found there are approximately 10 boats being stored at the compost site. Some are owned by Wright County, and some are owned by the Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Kaczmarek said he recommends giving the DNR notice that Wright County is looking to get rid of the free rental space, and if it chooses to, it can pay to store the boats.
Kaczmarek said in regard to the fire training facility, when he was at the Emergency Management Safety (EMS) meeting, they were trying to put a steering committee together but there wasn’t a lot of interested generated. There was concern from some of the smaller fire departments about leaving the city with equipment to attend training.
Vetsch said he would recommend having a letter sent to the DNR, stating something to the effect that if the DNR is storing equipment at the compost facility site they are storing it at their own risk and the county does not assume liability. Assistant County Attorney Greg Kryzer clarified that the Board would like to draft a lease agreement, that if something happens to the boats the county is held harmless. He said it should be easy, and the DNR would need to sign the lease agreement.
RECOMMENDATION: Kelly will reach out to the Sheriff’s Office and the Parks and Recreation Department to find out if the stored equipment at the compost site is still being utilized. Kelly will also reach out to the Fire Department Chiefs to find out if they are still interested in the fire training facility. Wilczek will move forward with getting the structural assessment with different options for the hangar and other building. He will wait for further instruction before getting the civil assessment. Kryzer will draft a lease agreement for the storage of the DNR boats.
V. Teams and County Board Meetings
Vetsch said Microsoft Teams is efficient for staff that don’t need to attend board meetings in person. This has helped save time and money for the county because staff are able to listen to the meeting and still able to do other work such as answer emails and phone calls.
RECOMMENDATION: The Board recommended keeping Teams available for staff that don’t need to attend in person. However, if a staff member has a Timed Agenda Item, that person will need to attend the meeting. YouTube Live will be for residents that want to stay informed. If a resident wants to speak at a meeting they will still have to email or call Administration to be put on an Agenda and will need to attend in person.
Wetter moved to accept the Committee of the Whole meeting minutes and recommendations from 6-8-21. The motion was seconded by Vetsch and carried 5-0.
I. Continuation of American Rescue Plan Discussion
Project Administrator Elizabeth Karels summarized the discussion that was held at the previous meeting. The committee was presented the remainder of a PowerPoint presentation from the June 1, 2021 meeting. Cities and townships are expected to receive their own allocation of funds through the state. Additionally, there are several federal- and state-administered programs available through the American Rescue Plan (ARP) such as capital projects, housing, and small business assistance. Some things being proposed may be funded better through other sources.
Assistant Finance Director Heather Lemieux stated the first half of the American Rescue Plan Recovery Act funds ($13,439,055) has been received. Internal reimbursements of funds spent will be transferred into Department 100. However, if funds are approved for Health & Human Services (HHS), the expenditures will be spent from a different account for grant reporting purposes. The American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) committee consists of several internal staff members. The committee will review expenditures and make recommendations to the County Board for approval via the consent agenda.
Commissioner Vetsch stated if funds are allocated to an internal department, such as HHS, the internal group would meet as a committee and make recommendations for the disbursement of funds. The recommendation would be sent to the County Board via the consent agenda for final approval and release of the funds. Each internal group receiving an allocation will create their own application process that must be approved by the ARPA committee. HHS Financial Services Manager Kimberly Johnson stated HHS already has a system in place to approve disbursement of funds to those in need. She suggested the County Crisis Plan be approved to release the funds. Waiting on committee approval may not be the most efficient way to release funds. Vetsch stated HHS could potentially use two different processes; some funds would be routed through the committee for approval, while others would follow the traditional process. Finance Director Lindsey Meyer stated there is concern funds being spent outside the guidelines of the grant and would like oversight in the process.
The group discussed the process for external applicants. Programs will be pre-approved and a formal application providing more detail will follow. All funds will be reimbursed after supporting documentation is received. The ARPA committee will conduct yearly check-ins to ensure the proposed programs are being fulfilled.
The committee was presented a summary of proposed uses for fund allocation. Proposed programs have been divided into categories. Commissioner Kaczmarek stated he felt things are being rushed. He would like to take more time to evaluate wants vs. needs. Vetsch said the group will not be able to approve all of the proposed programs and some programs take a long time to develop.
Education, Jobs, and Training: Commissioner Daleiden would like 4-H to be added to this category. Vetsch stated some programs, such as Career Exploration Camp and Consumer Outreach, could be a joint effort between Sherburne County and Wright County, lowering the amount of money that would need to be allocated.
Business and Economic Relief: Wright County Economic Development Partnership Executive Director Jolene Foss reached out to various agencies to develop program ideas. Some of the programs did not fit the criteria and were removed from the list.
Families: Kaczmarek would like funds allocated to Domestic Violence and Mental Health. Commissioner Husom suggested allocating funds to Rivers of Hope. The group discussed several issues relating to childcare retention and expansion. There have been an increased number of referrals to Safe Families throughout the pandemic. HHS would like to increase Safe Families staff time in the county with a focus on volunteer recruitment, training, and support.
Support to Schools: Vetsch clarified the afterschool program covers multiple school districts, not only Monticello. Numerous students have been truant due to remote learning. The proposed program funds teachers for an additional two hours per day and would facilitate rides for students. Additionally, there has been an increase in counseling needs due to the pandemic. The request would place an additional counselor in each district to help facilitate needs.
Internal County Expenses: HHS would like to purchase a programmable sign. Daleiden suggested purchasing two for the county. Kaczmarek raised concerns relating to the cost, maintenance, storage, and lifespan of programmable signs. Public Health Director Sarah Grosshuesch suggested purchasing one programmable sign that could be used by both Public Health and the Highway Department and another smaller, more portable sign. The Community Health Needs Assessment was approved in CARES funding and is mandated. It provides savings to the county and provides good information.
Mental Health Stabilization – Outreach and Crisis Expansion: HHS proposed an additional staff member to assist with mental health outreach. Social Services Manager Michelle Miller stated the idea is to integrate social workers and law enforcement. De-escalation training for county staff was discussed. Kaczmarek mentioned online training is available and there may be expertise within the Sheriff’s Office that could assist. Diane Erkens provided information on withdrawal management/detox. Withdrawal management is a medically managed service. Currently detoxification services are not paid by medical programs, while withdrawal management are paid by limited providers. At this time, the county is responsible for detoxification services. HHS Director Jami Goodrum Schwartz would like funds allocated to support the new Behavioral Health Center. Wright County is far away from many services and would like to support something closer.
Transportation Infrastructure: Currently, officers and social workers are driving individuals to detox. HHS would like to develop transportation infrastructure for residents who otherwise have limited to no transportation resources.
Broadband, Water & Sewer Infrastructure: Vetsch would like to support city and township water and sewer infrastructure improvement projects via a grant program.
Commissioner Wetter stated the message should be clear to residents that these programs may only last four years. The county may not be able to afford to maintain programs in the future. Vetsch would like to pick some of the proposals and start moving forward as the need is currently there. Kaczmarek stated more information needs to come before the board for evaluation. Vetsch suggested the board could approve funding on a year-to-year basis.
RECOMMENDATIONS:
• Staff will document the process for approving proposed programs for the allocation of American Rescue Plan funds.
• Staff will determine which programs are eligible/ineligible.
• Staff will determine if better-suited funding sources are available for any of the proposed programs.
• Commissioners will identify the top three programs they would like to pursue.
• Contact Wright Technical Center Director Brian Koslofsky regarding the proposed work training program.
• A continuation of the meeting is scheduled for 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, June 16, 2021.
PERSONNEL COMMITTEE MEETING MINUTES 6-9-21
Vetsch moved to accept the Personnel Committee meeting minutes and recommendations from 6-9-21. The motion was seconded by Husom and carried 5-0.
I. Health & Human Services
A. Approve a contracted Registered Nurse (RN) position for the Public Health Division not to exceed 20 hours per week on average through 2021 or no more than 600 hours
Health and Human Services Director Jami Goodrum Schwartz distributed a copy of the Request for Board Action (RFBA) that had been attached to the Commissioner’s Board Meeting agenda on May 25, 2021 which included background information for this request. (attached and summarized below).
Director of Public Health Sarah Grosshuesch stated that Public Health currently has one contract RN to assist with the vaccination and other health care services in the community. The county anticipates higher than normal demand for COVID -19 vaccinations over the next several months as more age groups become eligible and students return to school. Public Health staff are beginning to resume pre-COVID related to work duties resulting in Public Health’s need to increase clinical staff capacity. In addition, Public Health anticipates a decline in access to volunteers’ services as the focus of the pandemic moves away from the executive orders that allow additional vaccinators from alternative professions. Over the first three months of 2021 Public Health relied heavily on RN/PHN volunteer hours (172.5 regular work hours and 128.75 overtime hours by PHNs). Funding for this contract is available through the Immunization Cooperative Agreement COVID-19 Vaccination grant.
Commissioners Daleiden and Vetsch asked if this request was a budget neutral position?
Goodrum Schwartz confirmed that this request for a contract RN is budget neutral for the County.
RECOMMENDATION: APPROVE A CONTRACTED RN POSITION FOR THE PUBLIC HEALTH DIVISION NOT TO EXCEED 20 HRS PER WEEK OR NO MORE THAN 600 HOURS FOR THE REMAINDER OF 2021.
II. Information Technology
A. Discussion of IT Senior Technical Support Specialist and IT Business Analyst, as fulfilling the 2nd & 3rd approved positions as part of the 2021 IT Department Budget
Information Technology Director Matthew Fomby noted that the County Board had approved three new positions as part of the 2021 Information Technology (IT) department budget. One position has already been filled, with the second and third positions being requested for approval by the County Board. Fomby stated the salaries and benefits for both proposed positions are covered in the 2021 IT Department Budget.
Discussion took place with the Personnel Committee regarding staffing concerns in the IT Department. Over the past year-and-a-half, the IT department has been dealing with the challenges of providing remote access to employees due to the pandemic as well as managing on-going projects and personnel issues.
Commissioner Vetsch said that he appreciates the stability in the IT Department and that he trusts the direction leadership is headed, but he always wants accountability from the supervisors to better manage the workflow for these positions and projects.
Fomby agreed and said that he has discussed these plans with his division managers and would like to proceed with these two position requests.
Daleiden and Vetsch were agreeable to proceeding with the two position requests (Senior Technical Support Specialist and Business Analyst) from the IT Department under the following three conditions:
a. Begin the implementing of a new inventory tracking system for IT devices in the County.
b. Begin implementing changes necessary to clean-up and improve the County’s Track-It System.
c. Work on improving daily communication between upper management and staff members and setting clear expectations for staff members moving forward.
RECOMMENDATION: APPROVE THE HIRING A SENIOR TECHNICAL SUPPORT SPECIALIST AND BUSINESS ANALYST AS PART OF THE 2021 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY BUDGET.
BROADBAND COMMITTEE MEETING MINUTES 6-9-21
Vetsch moved to accept the Broadband Committee meeting minutes and recommendations from 6-9-21. The motion was seconded by Wetter and carried 5-0.
I. Minnesota Rural Broadband Coalition – Speed Test Data and Legislative Updates
Nathan Zacharias introduced himself to the committee. He is currently a lobbyist for the Minnesota Rural Broadband Coalition and Project Manager for the Minnesota Speed Test Initiative. The Minnesota Rural Broadband Coalition was formed in 2015.
Zacharias said a special legislative session will be held June 14, 2021. There is an agreement between the House Speaker, the Majority Leader in the Senate, and the Governor for a $70 million for Border-to-Border Broadband Grant program. The funding would be spread over two years with $35 million allocated each year. Applications for the grant funding would be due in the fall, funds would be announced in January, and projects would begin next summer. The money is coming from the Capital Projects Fund, which is part of the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA). There are suggestions that the amount of funding may be increased. The bill needs a super majority in the State Legislature in order to pass.
State and local funds from ARPA are eligible for broadband use under certain criteria; they must be reliable, future-proof, and meet speed requirements. Communications Specialist John Holler asked if investing a portion of federal ARPA funds in broadband would increase or decrease the County’s chances of obtaining additional funds from the state level. Zacharias stated the state border-to-border broadband program scores applications by community, giving more weight to applications that have community buy-in; ultimately increasing the chance of receiving additional funds.
Commissioner Vetsch stated the source of funding has changed from previous funding allocations. He questioned if the funds would be tied to bonding requirements that would be different than previous rounds of grants. Zacharias said it is in the bonding bill, but general obligation bonds or appropriation bonds will not be used to pay for it. The bill will direct the state to spend the money from the Capital Projects fund from the ARPA.
The state has not changed the requirements for speed. In order to qualify for a grant from the State of Minnesota, through the border-to-border program, the project has to have at least be 25 megabits per second (Mbps) download speed and at least 3 Mbps upload speed and be scalable to 100 downloads by 20 uploads. The state is not interested investing in outdated technology. It wants future-proof networks. The project that has better speeds is more likely to receive the grant funds.
Zacharias showed the committee the map of Speed Test Data. As of Wednesday, May 26, 2020, there was a 3 percent participation rate based on total households in the county. Approximately 42.5 percent of the test results are below 25 Mbps. Another 40 percent are between 25 and 150 Mbps. 15 percent are about 150 Mbps. Generally speaking, more populated areas provide better speeds than rural areas. Some areas have what is called the “donut hole phenomenon” where the rural area surrounding a municipality provides better speed. In a municipality, many times existing infrastructure must be removed for installation.
Zacharias gave a tutorial of Speed Test map features. The blue dots on the map are Census blocks and show where funds have been deployed in the past. Data can be pulled from a particular township or an area drawn on the map. The purpose of the map is to provide data that can be used when applying for grants. Zacharias encouraged the county to have as many households participate as possible. He has granted the Project Administrator Elizabeth Karels access to Wright County data.
RECOMMENDATION: Informational only.
II. Feasibility Study Proposals
Karels stated five proposals were received. The RFP asked proposals to answer the following questions:
• What is the current state of broadband in the county?
• Where does broadband need to be improved?
• What is the strategy that creates the greatest opportunity to meet broadband needs within the county?
Information Technology Director Matthew Fomby stated he narrowed the selection to Geo Partners and Design Nine. Each provided something different. The group discussed the pros and cons of each proposal, taking the timeline into consideration. The group agreed to move forward with Design Nine.
RECOMMENDATION: Approve the contract with Design Nine pending the reference checks and an interview. Karels will conduct the reference checks and a meeting will be scheduled with Design Nine to present and answer questions.
III. Webpage Review
The group viewed the Broadband Committee web page. Additional information will be added to the page as it becomes available.
RECOMMENDATION: Informational only.
IV. Other Staff Updates
Holler mentioned using the blank side of the Parks and Recreation flyer as a marketing space for broadband. Marketing at the County Fair and post card mailings were also discussed.
RECOMMENDATION: Informational only.
V. Action Items/Agenda for Next Meeting
Set the next meeting date at a future County Board meeting.
The meeting adjourned at 10:32 a.m.
County Board Minutes submitted by Angie Fisher, Administrative Specialist
Published in the Herald Journal, July 2, 2021.
WARRANTS FOR PUBLICATION
Warrants Approved On 5/26/2021For Payment 5/26/2021
ALL STATE COMMUNICATIONS INC 357,000.00
ARCHITECTURAL PANEL SYSTEMS INC 26,743.14
BOSER CONSTRUCTION INC 43,417.85
BOSER CONSTRUCTION INC 19,611.59
CENTRAL MN CONCRETE CUTTING 2,392.50
CONTEGRITY GROUP 79,292.58
DESIGN ELECTRICAL INC-COLD SPRING ELEC. 201,662.33
FORD METRO INC 17,440.10
GEORGE F COOK CONSTRUCTION CO 104,500.00
HEATER RENTAL SERVICES LLC 3,372.40
HIGH PERFORMANCE COATINGS INC 80,632.73
HUMERA TECH 13,592.13
INSTITUTE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT 2,154.00
MASTERS PLUMBING HEATING & COOLING 170,776.75
NORTHLAND CONCRETE & MASONRY CO LLC 205,186.70
PATRIOT ERECTORS INC 8,474.11
RTL CONSTRUCTION 96,967.88
SONUS INTERIORS INC 38,000.00
VEIT DISPOSAL SYSTEMS 4,030.00
WCS1 LLC 9,500.00
WEIDNER PLUMBING AND HEATING CO 82,457.02
5 Payments less than 2000 4,391.55
Final Total: 1,571,595.36
Warrants Approved On 5/26/2021For Payment 5/26/2021
ABM BUILDING VALUE 52,118.33
ALLINA HOSPITALS & CLINICS 2,106.00
ARAMARK SERVICES INC 8,047.72
FURTHER 2,676.90
GUARDIAN FLEET SAFETY LLC 2,603.44
HARTFORD 25,867.41
LIMNOPRO AQUATIC SCIENCE, INC. 9,208.34
MEND CORRECTIONAL CARE PLLC 42,715.10
RUSSELL SECURITY RESOURCE LLC 3,083.00
SELECT COMMERCIAL SERVICES 4,042.52
THOMSON REUTERS WEST PUBLISHING CORP 2,607.69
TW VENDING INC 18,714.28
WRIGHT HENNEPIN ELECTRIC 2,627.52
49 Payments less than 2000 23,371.01
Final Total: 199,789.26
Warrants Approved On 5/26/2021For Payment 5/26/2021
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 111 TR 150,339.61
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 2687 825,484.10
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 466 544,887.36
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 728 3,385,844.75
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 742 236,007.59
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 876 1,299,903.97
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 877 3,981,211.62
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 879 1,442,395.88
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 881 706,821.68
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 882 2,753,086.53
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 883 580,748.65
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 885 3,643,975.13
1 Payment less than 2000 207.58
Final Total: 19,550,914.45
Warrants Approved For Payment 5/27/2021
MN DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE 3,346,135.82
Final Total: 3,346,135.82
Warrants Approved On 5/28/2021For Payment 5/28/2021
CARAHSOFT TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION 3,270.94
DELL MARKETING LP 18,641.14
DHS- SWIFT 4,586.72
PCI ROADS LLC 59,702.02
THECO INC 4,500.00
TRUENORTH STEEL 17,473.92
WSB & ASSOCIATES INC 28,530.51
18 Payments less than 2000 7,664.93
Final Total: 144,370.18
Warrants Approved On 6/02/2021For Payment 6/02/2021
A M MAUS & SON INC 42,937.93
ARAMARK SERVICES INC 8,166.96
BRADBURY STAMM CONSTRUCTION WINKELMAN 16,225.71
CENTRAL MN SEXUAL ASSAULT CTR 2,500.00
CLIFTONLARSONALLEN LLP 17,850.00
ENCARTELE INC 3,500.00
MEADA 5,000.00
RIVERS OF HOPE 5,000.00
TERNING EXCAVATING INC 6,500.00
TW VENDING INC 17,787.81
WSB & ASSOCIATES INC 5,216.50
40 Payments less than 2000 14,446.23
Final Total: 145,131.14
Warrants Approved On 6/04/2021For Payment 6/04/2021
BROCK WHITE CO LLC 2,143.92
CENTRA SOTA COOPERATIVE - BUFFALO 45,684.40
COMM OF MMB, TREAS DIV 47,944.50
CONVERGEONE, INC. 27,200.00
CORNERSTONE AUTOMOTIVE 3,638.99
FINLEY ENGINEERING COMPANY INC 4,299.93
FRSECURE LLC 2,375.00
GLOVER CONSULTING LLC 10,935.00
HOUSTON ENGINEERING INC 4,049.23
INTEREUM INC 9,039.27
ON-DEMAND SERVICES GROUP INC 25,351.25
PARK CONSTRUCTION COMPANY 589,959.02
ROYAL TIRE INC 4,642.60
SKYNORTH SOFTWARE LLC 2,704.00
SUBURBAN TIRE WHOLESALE INC 3,150.00
THECO INC 4,500.00
TRUENORTH STEEL 2,964.48
39 Payments less than 2000 15,186.37
Final Total: 805,767.96
Warrants Approved On 6/04/2021For Payment 6/04/2021
AFSCME LOCAL 2685 4,030.66
AIG RETIREMENT COMPANY 7,347.92
FIDELITY SECURITY LIFE/EYEMED VISION CAR 2,323.92
HEALTH PARTNERS 35,291.16
HEALTH PARTNERS - DENTAL 11,363.36
ING 12,723.00
MATRIX TRUST COMPANY 3,475.00
MN PUBLIC EMPLOYEES ASSOCIATION 2,262.00
MSRS HEALTH CARE SAVINGS PLAN 70,206.21
NATIONWIDE RETIREMENT SOLUTIONS 2,797.00
PUBLIC EMP RETIREMENT ASSN 375,982.98
WRIGHT CO CAFETERIA PLAN 30,778.99
WRIGHT COUNTY - CAFETERIA 79,375.00
WRIGHT COUNTY DEPUTIES ASSOCIATION 7,100.00
4 Payments less than 2000 3,176.00
Final Total: 648,233.20
Warrants Approved On 6/07/2021For Payment 6/07/2021
ANOKA COUNTY - MEDICAL EXAMINER 83,294.25
ARAMARK SERVICES INC 8,253.96
GABRIEL/CATHLEEN 7,280.00
QUALITY RADIOLOGIC CONSULTANTS INC 5,000.00
VILLAGE RANCH INC 42,776.68
39 Payments less than 2000 13,364.34
Final Total: 159,969.23
Warrants ApprovedFor Payment 6/07/2021
INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE (IRS) 464,859.31
MN DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES 8,039.90
MN DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE 91,822.03
Final Total: 564,721.24
Warrants Approved On 6/07/2021For Payment 6/07/2021
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 111 TR 150,339.62
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 2687 824,844.53
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 466 544,887.41
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 728 3,384,651.33
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 742 236,007.57
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 876 1,299,838.04
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 877 3,979,467.59
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 879 1,441,063.52
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 881 706,821.71
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 882 2,748,801.73
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 883 580,748.73
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 885 3,643,133.13
1 Payment less than 2000 207.57
Final Total: 19,540,812.48
Warrants Approved On 6/08/2021For Payment 6/08/2021
CENTERPOINT ENERGY 8,381.41
CENTURYLINK 10,713.68
CORELOGIC 6,669.79
MINNWEST BANK 2,795.00
SHERBURNE STATE BANK 2,305.00
WELLS FARGO 2,671.00
17 Payments less than 2000 3,979.97
Final Total: 37,515.85
Warrants ApprovedFor Payment 6/08/2021
MN DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE 1,050,952.68
Final Total: 1,050,952.68
Warrants ApprovedFor Payment 6/08/2021
MN DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE 3,340,896.48
Final Total: 3,340,896.48
Published in the Herald Journal, July 2, 2021.
CITY OF MAYERORDINANCE # 232AN ORDINANCE RENAMING STREETS IN THE CITY OF MAYER AND AMENDING THEADDRESS OF PROPERTY ON SUCH STREETS
BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF MAYER THAT:
Section 1. AUTHORITY. The City of Mayer has the authority, pursuant to Minnesota Statutes second 412.221, subdivision 18, to rename streets and renumber lots within the City by Ordinance.
Section 2. 7TH STREET NE. The street between Ash Avenue North/Minnesota State Highway 25 and up to and stopping at the entrance of the private street named 62nd Street NE in the City of Mayer shall be known as 7th Street NE.
Section 3. PROPERTY NUMBERS. In accordance with the convention in the City for property numbers, the property presently known by the address of 305 5th Street NE shall henceforth be known as 306 7th Street NE.
Section 4. EFFECTIVE DATE. This Ordinance was passed and adopted by the City Council of the City of Mayer, Minnesota, on the June 28, 2021.
Section 5. ENACTMENT.
Subdivision 1. All ordinances and resolutions of the City previously enacted, and all plats the City previously approved, which refer the streets or properties herein renamed or redesignated are hereby amended by substituting the street name and property addresses identified herein.
Subdivision 2. The City Clerk shall cause a City Address Map to reflect the street name and property address changes made in this Ordinance.
Subdivision 3. The City Clerk shall forward this Ordinance to the Carver County Recorder with the request that they change all plat, county, and city mapping to reflect the street name and property address changes made herein.
Subdivision 4. The City Clerk shall cause this Ordinance to be transmitted to the Carver County Auditor’s office, in compliance with Minnesota Statute, section 201.11, subdivision 2.
Subdivision 5. This Ordinance shall be applied as to all properties or parcels platted, subdivided, or otherwise issued addresses subsequent to the enactment of this Ordinance that are adjacent to the street renamed herein.
ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Mayer, Carver County, Minnesota this 28th day of 2021.
/s/ Mike Dodge, Mayor
Moved by: Council Member, Chad Heldt
Seconded by: Council Member, Larry
Millender
ATTEST:
Margaret McCallum, City Administrator
Published in the Herald Journal, July 2, 2021.
Winsted TownshipSpraying Notice
Winsted Township will spray volunteer trees and brush within Township Road R/W July 12 – July 23, 2021.
Areas of application will be Cable Avenue, Dairy Avenue, Eagle Avenue, Falcon Avenue, Dill Avenue, 212th Street west of Cable Avenue, 207th Street, 220th Street west of Cable Avenue, 237th Street and 245th Street.
Landowners not wanting adjacent Right of Way Spraying will need to call Brian Anderson at 320-395-2806 and please leave a voicemail.
Published in the Herald Journal, July 2 and July 9, 2021.