Wright County Board Minutes

WRIGHT COUNTY BOARD MINUTES
JULY 28, 2015
The Wright County Board met in regular session at 9:00 A.M. with Husom, Sawatzke, Daleiden, Potter and Borrell present.
Borrell moved to approve the 7-21-15 County Board Minutes as presented. The motion was seconded by Daleiden and carried 5-0.
Husom moved to approve the Agenda, seconded by Sawatzke, carried 5-0.
On a motion by Daleiden, second by Borrell, all voted to approve the Consent Agenda:
A. ADMINISTRATION
Refer To Ways & Means Committee the disposition of a water damage claim for the Wright County Historical Society
B. ADMINISTRATION
Authorize Signatures On Law Enforcement Contract With The City Of Waverly, Eff. 1-01-16 to 12-31-17
C. AUDITOR/TREASURER
Approve Claims as Listed in the Abstract, Subject to Audit, for a Total of $766,592.71, with 197 Vendors and 356 Transactions
D. ASSESSOR
Refer Assessor’s Office remodel & Expansion to Building Committee
E. ASSESSOR
POSITION REPLACEMENT:
1. Chief Deputy Assessor
F. ATTORNEY
Authorize signatures on a Grant Application for Emergency Funds from the Department of Public Safety for the year 2016 in the amount of $600 for the Victim/Witness Program. No matching local funds are required
G. SHERIFF’S OFFICE
POSITION REPLACEMENT:
1. Deputy
Denise McCalla, Chief Deputy Auditor/Treasurer, said the Auditor’s Certificate of Forfeiture was filed on 6-05-15 for PID #114-069-000030, Outlot C, Meadow Green Estates. The request is to approve a Certificate of Cancellation. Borrell moved to adopt Resolution #15-36, recommending the Certificate of Forfeiture be canceled. The motion was seconded by Husom and carried 5-0 on a roll call vote.
Daleiden moved to approve a Contract with CliftonLarsonAllen for audit services for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2016 and 2017, seconded by Borrell. The motion carried unanimously.
Borrell moved to approve the 7-20-15 Committee Of The Whole Minutes, seconded by Husom, carried 5-0. The Minutes of the Committee Meeting follow:
The Wright County Committee of the Whole met at 9:30 A.M. with Husom, Sawatzke, Daleiden, Potter and Borrell present.
Others attending were Kurt Deter from Rinke-Noonan, Brian Asleson- Wright County Attorney, Kerry Saxton from SWCD, Bob Hiivala- Wright County Auditor/Treasurer, and Mike Young- Wright County Ditch Inspector.
Hiivala opened the meeting at 9:45 A.M. by stating that the purpose of the meeting was to have Deter present to the board the Riparian Protection and Water Quality Practices Act, passed by the State Legislature, as to how it effects the county and where does the county go from here.
Deter stated that the bill is going to have a great impact. I generally favor buffers but some of the things in the bill make it difficult and the buffer requirement has a very tight timeline. It requires that the Drainage Authority start working on a plan and process almost immediately. The bill is one of Governor Dayton’s most important legacies and will not change as long as he is in office.
Deter presented the following PowerPoint Presentation:
I. Definitions
1. Buffer: Means an area consisting of perennial vegetation, excluding invasive plants and noxious weeds, adjacent to all bodies of water within the state and that protects the water resources of the state from runoff pollution; stabilizes soils, shores, and banks; and protects and provides riparian corridors.
Deter stated that he believes 80% of landowners have no idea of what this bill is or the effect it will have. Once the Drainage Authority is up to date, informational meetings with the landowners need to take place to educate them.
II. Who is Responsible for Buffers
1. Landowners owning property adjacent to a water body identified and mapped on a buffer protection map must maintain a buffer to protect the state’s water resources.
Borrell wanted to know if the bill is going to be challenged constitutionally. Deter stated that there will be challenges regarding the 50-foot new perennial vegetation buffer requirements applicable to landowners owning property adjacent to public waters.
III. Waters Covered/Widths
1. Public Waters: 50 foot average buffer width with 30 foot minimum width. Public waters as defined in Section 103G.005, Subd. 15.
2. Public Ditches: For public drainage system established under Chapter 103E, a 16 1⁄2 foot minimum width, continuous buffer of perennial rooted vegetation on ditches within the benefited area of public drainage systems.
3. Other waters determined by SWCDs and adopted into Water Management Plans:
• SWCD determination shall be a summary of water courses for inclusion in the Local Water Management Plan.
• Local Water Management Authority must revise its Comprehensive Local Water Management Plan or Comprehensive Watershed Management Plan to incorporate the Soil & Water Conservation District recommendations.
IV. Maps
1. Maps created by the DNR for public waters and public drainage systems and private systems within the benefited area of a public system.
2. SWCD map of watercourses for inclusion in Local Water Management Authority’s Plan.
Deter stated that the Soil & Water Conservation District must provide a summary of water courses for inclusion of the local management authority’s plan that are not public ditches under 103E. This requires effort on behalf of, not only the SWCD, but the County review of that submission of water courses.
V. Timelines
1. Buffer protection map prepared by DNR for public waters and public drainage systems does not have a date for completion. DNR goal is to have map by July 2016.
2. SWCD summary of water courses shall be done on or before July 1, 2017.
3. Buffers shall be in place as follows:
-By November 1, 2017 for public waters.
-By November 1, 2018 for public drainage systems (assume same date for private systems within benefited area).
Borrell brought up the fact that this bill may force the elimination of all open ditch systems which would then be replaced by tile and eliminate the need for buffers.
Deter stated that there will be additional flexibility. Landowners may choose to adopt other practices aimed at protecting water if those practices provide the same level of protection as a buffer.
Young asked who will establish and maintain a map that shows the areas subject to the buffer requirements. Deter stated that the DNR will establish and maintain a map of each county. Additionally, other waters may be subject to local requirements established by SWCD’s. The DNR anticipates completing the buffer protection maps by about July 2016. Buffers on public waters will be in place by November 1, 2017. Buffers on public drainage systems will be in place by November 1, 2018.
V. Possible Funding Sources
1. 103E buffer strips compensation for public drainage systems.
2. RIM buffer easements.
3. USDA Conservation Reserve Program.
4. RIM/CREP Easements
VI. Exemptions
1. Enrolled in CRP Program
2. Public or private water access or recreational use, including stairways, landings, picnic areas, access paths, beach and watercraft access areas.
3. Covered by road, trail, building or other structure.
4. Regulated by MPDS permit.
5. Municipal separate storm sewer system.
6. Construction stormwater.
7. Industrial stormwater.
8. Part of water inundation cropping system.
9. In a temporary non-vegetative condition due to drainage tile installation and maintenance, alfalfa or other perennial crop or plant seeding or construction or conservation projects authorized by federal, state or local governmental unit.
Deter pointed out that if a landowner doesn’t want to try and get funding, they still will be required to put in the buffer. Method of payment will be an issue. Even if 103E.021 concerning incremental implementation is used, without a Redetermination, the one rod grass strip is acquired using the early 1900 Viewers’ Report. That likely does not have enough benefits to acquire the grass strip and would be an unfair method of distribution of cost for the grass strip. You are going to have landowners start requesting redeterminations.
VII. Compliance
1. Soil and Water Conservation District notifies County or Watershed District of non-compliance site.
2. County or Watershed District must provide landowner with list of corrective actions and a timeline to meet requirements.
3. If landowner does not comply, County or Watershed District may enforce under 103E.101, Subd. 12(a), but before exercising this authority must adopt a plan containing procedures for administrative penalty orders.
4. If County or Watershed does not adopt a plan to enforce the Board of Water & Soil Resources may enforce for non-compliance sites.
5. The state may withhold funding from a County, Watershed District or Soil Water conservation District if it fails to implement this section. Funding subject to withholding includes Soil and Water Program Aid, Natural Resources Block Grant and other project or program funding.
Deter stated that although SWCD makes the determination whether a landowner is in compliance with this new section, the County is the enforcement agency. SWCD did not want to become the regulatory or the police. The County must adopt a plan containing procedures for issuance of administrative penalty orders. Daleiden asked if there was plans to come up with some boiler plate template for compliance procedures. Deter stated that yes that would make sense instead of every county trying to come up with something.
Deter pointed out that the state Board of Water and Soil Resources (BWSR) can withhold funds to soil and water conservation districts or from the County that fail to implement the law. We either meet the statute or at least be able to show we made every good faith effort to meet these very tight timelines.
Hiivala stated that in order for the county to require this buffer, we really need to get these redeterminations in place. Deter pointed out that the viewers are going to have a workload problem in trying to meet the requests of the Drainage Authorities for information and Redeterminations. Renville County alone are going to tie up all the viewers for the next 2-3 years.
Deter said his advice would be to start having informational meetings with the landowners. Brian Asleson or I would likely have to be there. Even if the landowners do not want to do redeterminations, the buffers still have to be put in. Dayton wanted to come up with a clean water act and part of it was wildlife habitat. The extensive system of buffers will provide nesting cover for pheasants, ducks and other wildlife.
It is the buffer or alternative practice if those practices provide the same level of protection as a buffer.
(End of 7-20-15 COTW Minutes)
A Building Committee Meeting was held on 7-22-15. At today’s County Board Meeting, Sawatzke stated he is supportive of the wRight Choice Program and allowing the School Districts to utilize space in the Government Center. He is concerned with the recommendation for the County to pay rent on behalf of the School Districts and thinks it crosses the line to provide free space. When the program started 3.5 years ago, the County had space for the program. There may become a point in time where the space is not available. He said this may be misunderstood in the future that the County is responsible for providing the space. He does not support this recommendation. After further discussion, Husom made a motion to refer all items back to the Building Committee. The motion was seconded by Daleiden and carried 5-0.
Sean Riley, Planning & Zoning Administrator, presented a Planning Commission recommendation for a Zoning Ordinance Amendment relating to Solar Energy Farms and Solar Energy Systems. Riley said that since this was last discussed by the County Board, it has been verified that adjacent townships are notified with a solar energy farm/system application. As requested by the County Board, the language was changed from “may” to “shall” relating to decommissioning on Page 4, Item 762.2, Solar Energy Farms Requirements and Standards, Item 9g. It was the consensus that this change will address the concerns of Buffalo Township. He said the remainder of the discussion previously by the Board was conceptual and did not necessarily relate to changing the proposed Amendment language. Borrell moved to adopt Ordinance Amendment #15-01 amending the Zoning Ordinance concerning Solar Energy Farms and Solar Energy Systems. The motion was seconded by Daleiden and carried 5-0. Ordinance Amendment #15-01 follows:
THE COUNTY BOARD OF WRIGHT COUNTY HEREBY ORDAINS:
The Wright County Zoning Ordinance is hereby amended as follows:
Insert in Section 302 Definitions
Solar Energy Systems – A solar panel or array mounted on a building, pole or rack that is secondary to the primary use of the parcel on which it is located and is one hundred (100) kilowatts direct current (DC) rated capacity and under.
Solar Energy Farms - A solar array composed of multiple solar panels on ground-mounted rack or poles which are the primary land use for the parcel on which it is located and is greater than one hundred (100) kilowatts direct current (DC) rated capacity.
762. SOLAR ENERGY FARMS AND SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS
762.1 Purpose
The purpose of this document is to set forth standards for Solar Energy Farms and Solar Energy Systems for Wright County.
762.2 Solar Energy Farms Requirements and Standards
Solar Energy Farms shall be subject to the following performance standards:
(1) Solar Energy Farms are composed of multiple solar panels on multiple mounting systems (poles or racks), and generally have a direct current (DC) rated capacity greater than one hundred (100) kilowatts. Solar Energy Farms greater than one hundred (100) kilowatts in all zones and Solar Energy Systems greater than ten (10) kilowatts in all zones except for General Agriculture (AG) require a Conditional Use Permit. Solar Energy Farms are not allowed in Residential Districts. The Planning Commission will require improvements for soil erosion control, storm water management and proper vegetative cover on those projects allowed in a Shoreland District. Solar Energy Farms are allowed up to ten (10) megawatts (which is equal to ten thousand (10,000) kilowatts).
(2) Solar Energy Farms in Agricultural, Commercial and Industrial Zoning Districts may not exceed twenty (20) feet in height at maximum design tilt.
(3) Location within Lot: Solar Energy Farms must meet the primary structure setbacks for the zoning district it is located within and will be measured from the closest point at maximum orientation.
(4) Storm water management shall meet the requirements of Wright County Zoning Ordinance and the State of Minnesota.
(5) Erosion and sediment control shall meet the requirements of Wright County Zoning Ordinance and the State of Minnesota.
(6) Foundations: The manufacturer’s engineer or another qualified engineer shall certify that the foundation and design of the solar panels are within accepted professional standards, given local soil and climate conditions.
(7) Other standards and codes: All Solar Energy Farms shall be in compliance with any applicable local, state and federal regulatory standards, including the State of Minnesota Uniform Building Code, as amended; the National Electric Code and National Electric Safety Code as amended.
(8) Power and communication lines: Power and communication lines running between banks of solar panels and to the point of interconnection of distribution utility or interconnections with buildings shall be buried underground as much as practical. Exemptions may be granted by the Wright County Planning Commission in instances where shallow bedrock, water courses, or other elements of the natural landscape interfere with the ability to bury lines.
(9) Application requirements: The following information shall be provided to Wright County Planning and Zoning Department for application of a Conditional Use Permit:
(a) A site plan of existing applicable conditions showing the following:
(1) Existing property lines and property lines extending one hundred (100) feet from the exterior boundaries.
(2) Existing public and private roads and any easements.
(3) Location and size of any abandoned wells and sewage treatment systems.
(4) Existing buildings and any impervious surface.
(5) Topography at two (2) foot intervals and source of contour interval, unless determined otherwise by the Wright County Planning and Zoning Department.
(6) Existing vegetation.
(7) Waterways, watercourses, lakes and wetlands.
(8) The one hundred (100) year flood elevation and Regulatory Flood Protection Elevation, if available.
(9) Floodway, flood fringe and/or Flood Plain (FP) District boundary, if applicable.
(10) The Shoreland District boundary, if any portion of the project is located in a Shoreland District.
(11) In the Shoreland District, the ordinary high water level.
(12) In the Shoreland District, the toe and top of a bluff within the project boundaries.
(13) Surface water drainage patterns.
(b) Site Plan of Proposed Conditions:
(1) Planned location and spacing of solar panels.
(2) Planned location of access roads.
(3) Planned location of underground or overhead electric lines connecting the Solar Energy Farms or Solar Energy Systems to the building, substation or other electric load.
(4) Planned new electrical equipment other than at the existing building or substation that is the connection point for the Solar Energy Farm.
(5) Proposed erosion and sediment control measures as required in Section 710 and 728 of the Wright County Zoning Ordinance. If required, the Wright County Planning Commission may review the associated land alteration for a Solar Energy Farms or Solar Energy Systems and issue a Conditional Use Permit for that land alteration as part of the request for the Solar Energy Farms or Solar Energy Systems Conditional Use Permit.
(6) Proposed storm water management measures.
(7) Sketch elevation of the premises accurately depicting the proposed Solar Energy Farm or Solar Energy Systems and its relationship to structures on adjacent lots (if any) unless determined otherwise by the Wright County Planning and Zoning Department.
(c) Specifications and proposed installation methods for all planned major equipment, including solar panels, mounting systems and foundations for poles or racks.
(d) The planned number of panels to be installed.
(e) A description of the method of connecting the array to a building or substation.
(f) A copy of the submitted interconnection application with the local electric utility or a written explanation outlining why an interconnection application is not necessary.
(g) A decommissioning plan shall be required to ensure that facilities are properly removed after their useful life. Decommissioning of solar panels must occur in the event they are not in use for twelve (12) consecutive months. The plan shall include provisions for removal of all structures and foundations, restoration of soil and vegetation and a plan describing the financial resources that will be available to fully decommission the site. The Commission may require the posting of a bond, letter of credit or the establishment of an escrow during a point in the life of the project to ensure proper decommissioning. The decommissioning plan shall also include a statement that any unused or obsolete equipment shall be removed by the property owner and/or applicant. Said plan shall be signed by the applicant and the property owner and shall be attached to and become part of the permit.
(10) The Conditional Use Permit for Solar Energy Farms shall expire at the same time the Solar Energy Farm lease expires, but in no case shall exceed thirty (30) years. A new Conditional Use Permit can be applied for and the County may issue a new Conditional Use Permit for an existing Solar Energy Farms under the terms of Section 505 of the Wright County Zoning Ordinance. The Wright County Planning Commission may waive the expiration requirement for Solar Energy Farms located on property owned by public utilities and other unique owner operated facilities. Conditional Use Permits for Solar Energy Systems do not expire unless the Solar Energy System is removed.
(11) The Wright County Planning Commission may require a buffer between Solar Energy Farms and adjoining properties.
(12) The Wright County Planning Commission may require a greater setback between adjoining properties if conditions warrant.
762.3 Solar Energy Systems Requirements and Standards
Solar Energy Systems ten (10) kilowatts and under are a permitted accessory use in all zoning districts. Solar Energy Systems over ten (10) kilowatts and not exceeding one hundred (100) kilowatts require a Conditional Use Permit.
Solar Energy Systems one hundred (100) kilowatts and under are a permitted accessory use in the General Agricultural (AG) Zoning District.
(1) Accessory Building Limit: Solar Energy Systems, either roof or ground-mounted, do not count as an accessory building for the purpose of limits on accessory buildings.
(2) Height: Solar Energy Systems are subject to the following height requirements:
(a) Building or roof- mounted Solar Energy Systems shall not exceed the maximum allowed height in any zoning district.
(b) Ground or pole-mounted Solar Energy Systems shall not exceed fifteen (15) feet in height when oriented at maximum tilt in residential Zoning Districts and may be allowed up to twenty (20) feet in other Zoning Districts.
(3) Location within Lot: Solar Energy Systems must meet the accessory structure setback for the zoning district it is located within and will be measured from the closest point at maximum orientation. If attached to the primary structure, the Solar Energy Systems must meet the setbacks for the primary structure.
(4) Approved Solar Components: Electric Solar Energy System components must have an Underwriters Laboratory (UL) listing.
(5) Compliance with State Electric Code: All Solar Energy Systems shall comply with the Minnesota State Electric Code.
(6) Utility Notification: No Solar Energy System shall be installed until evidence has been given to the Wright County Planning and Zoning Department that the owner has notified the utility company of the customer’s intent to install an interconnected customer-owned generator. Off-grid systems are exempt from this requirement.
Language (shown in bold) to be added to the following Sections:
603 Agricultural Residential (A/R)
603.2 Permitted Uses
Solar Energy Systems ten (10) kilowatts and under
603.4 Conditional Uses
Solar Energy Systems over ten (10) kilowatts up to one hundred (100) kilowatts
604 General Agriculture (AG)
604.2 Permitted Uses
Solar Energy Systems
604.4 Conditional Uses
Solar Energy Farms
605 Urban/Rural Transitional (R-1)
605.2 Permitted Uses
Solar Energy Systems ten (10) kilowatts and under
605.4 Conditional Uses
Solar Energy Systems over ten (10) kilowatts up to one hundred (100) kilowatts
606 Suburban Residential (R-2)
606.2 Permitted Uses
Solar Energy Systems ten (10) kilowatts and under
606.4 Conditional Uses
Solar Energy Systems over ten (10) kilowatts up to one hundred (100) kilowatts
606.a Suburban Residential (R-2a)
606.a2 Permitted Uses
Solar Energy Systems ten (10) kilowatts and under
606.a4 Conditional Uses
Solar Energy Systems over ten (10) kilowatts up to one hundred (100) kilowatts
607 Multiple Family Urban District (R-3)
607.4 Conditional Uses
Solar Energy Systems over ten (10) kilowatts up to one hundred (100) kilowatts
608 Highway Business District (B-1)
608.2 Conditional Uses
Solar Energy Farms
Solar Energy Systems over ten (10) kilowatts up to one hundred (100) kilowatts
609 General Business District (B-2)
609.2 Conditional Uses
Solar Energy Farms
Solar Energy Systems over ten (10) kilowatts up to one hundred (100) kilowatts
610 General Industry District (I-1)
610.2 Conditional Uses
Solar Energy Farms
Solar Energy Systems over ten (10) kilowatts up to one hundred (100) kilowatts
612.8 Commercial – Recreational Shoreland District (S-3)
612.8 (3) Conditional Uses
Solar Energy Farms
Solar Energy Systems over ten (10) kilowatts up to one hundred (100) kilowatts
Enacting Clause:
This ordinance amendment is effective the day following final adoption and publication. The enacting clause will not be incorporated into the final Wright County Zoning Ordinance.
Adopted by the Wright County Board of Commissioners this 28th day of July, 2015.
(End of Ordinance Amendment #15-01)
A Personnel Committee Meeting was held on 7-22-15. At today’s County Board Meeting, Husom moved to approve the Minutes and recommendations. The motion was seconded by Sawatzke. After discussion, Borrell asked to amend the motion to change the performance review rating for Virgil Hawkins to “Exceeds Expectations” as two Commissioners had not filled out the Performance Reviews. Kelly said he learned that the notification to Commissioners did not go out. Given that information, Husom and Sawatzke then withdrew their motion to approve the Minutes and recommendations. Husom made a motion to table or lay over the Minutes and recommendations until the 8-04-15 Board Meeting, seconded by Sawatzke. Daleiden requested a friendly amendment to include scheduling a training session for the Commissioners on filling out Performance Appraisals. This should be scheduled with the Human Resources Director and occur after September. The motion carried 5-0.
A Ways & Means Committee Meeting was held on 7-22-15. At today’s County Board Meeting, discussion occurred on the recommendation by the Committee to authorize purchases. It was noted that some savings may be realized through discontinuing with current software programs. The following change was made to the minutes on Page 1, Phillips RFX AED topic, last sentence should read, “Sawatzke said an AED for a campground could be funded through the campground fund” (Sawatzke). Sawatzke moved to approve the Minutes and recommendation, seconded by Husom. The motion carried 5-0. The 7-22-15 Ways & Means Committee Minutes follow:
I. MCIT 2014 Workers Compensation Audit Refund Check.
Dahl said the County annually estimates the upcoming year’s payroll and submits that amount to MCIT (Minnesota Counties Intergovernmental Trust). A refund is being realized for 2014 in the amount of $38,687. The overestimate relates to employees who retired and were at the top of their salary range. Approximately $33,000 is available to the General Fund after the refund is broken out to three funds in the Workers Compensation area.
Dahl asked the Committee to consider utilizing the refund for four projects totaling $32,670 (attached). The projects are outlined below:
Resource Now (Safety Software), $11,000. Staff will be entered into a software program by job classification, and the program will reflect OSHA and safety-related training requirements. Training can then occur online. Dahl estimates that it would take a full-time person 8 months to provide the necessary training for employees in person.
NEO GOV OnBoarding, $10,620. The Human Resources Department currently uses NEO GOV for position recruitments. Hesse would like to add NEO GOV OnBoarding with implementation on 1-01-16. A database will store onboarding information and include Human Resources required documentation for new employees. New employees will complete paperwork online prior to their first day of employment. Electronic signatures will allow for better tracking methods for training and forms. Other departments will have access to OnBoarding for position-specific training requirements or documents. Hesse said the $10,620 will be an annual cost for licenses, subscription, and maintenance fees. A 10% discount is effective through the end of August. Implementation will be phased. An ongoing piece will be electronic training of current staff which is verified through electronic signature by the employee.
Microsoft Surface, $4,650. Dahl proposed the purchase of three Microsoft Surfaces (small computers for note taking).
Phillips RFX AED, $6,400. The AED’s were installed about 12 years ago and require a parts update. All AED’s will be inventoried. Grants are being investigated. All AED’s for public use must be on the National Register. There is a request to add an AED in the Parks Department. Sawatzke said an AED for a campground could be funded through the campground fund.
Sawatzke suggested that any required projects be funded from the Safety Budget line item upon Board approval. He did not desire having departments submit separate requests for turn back or refund dollars. He thought those dollars should be placed in a large pool for consideration of projects throughout the organization. He said the purchase of Microsoft Surface computers could be discussed during 2016 budget discussions.
Recommendation: Authorize proceeding with the purchase of the Resource Now (Safety Software) at $11,000; the NEO GOV OnBoarding at $10,620; and four Phillips RFX AED’s at $6,400. Funding will be from the Administration Department budget, noting that the line item(s) may exceed budget in 2015 because of these expenditures.
(End of 7-22-15 Ways & Means Committee Minutes)
Advisory Committee/Advisory Board Updates:
Wright County Fair: Borrell said the Fair starts tomorrow. He invited the County Board to Senior Day at the Fair.
AIS Task Force: Daleiden attended a meeting last Thursday. Clearwater Lake has zebra mussels. Lake access is in Stearns County. Stearns County did not use their AIS funding toward boat inspections. Wright County may work with Stearns County on this effort.
River Rider: A meeting will be held today at 1:30 p.m. to review the CliftonLarsonAllen audit. It will be sent to MnDOT for a final wrap up which includes an audit.
Bills Approved
3 D Specialties Inc $414.71
Allina Hospitals & Clinics 300.00
American Databank LLC 790.00
American Planning Association 295.00
Annandale/City of 485.25
Anoka County Fiscal Services 11,889.00
Anoka County Sheriff 24,970.37
Aramark Services Inc 7,946.31
Barth/Catheryn 152.50
Bound Tree Medical LLC 382.35
BP Amoco 498.54
BP Amoco 750.68
Brock White Co LLC 506.43
Buffalo Township 1,264.30
Burdas Towing 274.00
CDW Government Inc 9,171.39
Center Point Energy 387.84
Centra Sota Coop. - Buffalo 42,786.05
CenturyLink 4,999.32
Chamberlain Oil Co 698.70
CliftonLarsonAllen LLP 500.00
Cokato/City of 1,019.40
Corinna Township 872.00
Dell Marketing LP 1,231.43
Exceptional Outdoor Services 418.55
First Choice-Hutchinson 111.82
Franklin Township 1,835.20
Gabriel/Cathleen 100.00
Gale-Tec Engineering Inc 692.50
Garage Door Store 1,450.00
Grainger 416.26
Granite Electronics 512.20
Hickmans Service Inc 2,550.00
Hillyard Inc - Minneapolis 2,443.99
Howard/Jolanta 200.00
Intereum Inc 284.55
Interstate Automotive 125.00
Junction Towing & Auto Repair 140.00
Karels Towing 328.00
Lacount Sales LLC 143.17
Laplant Demo Inc 1,526.55
Laurent/Michael 135.47
Liman Post & Beam 150,000.00
M & M Express Sales and Service 167.10
Marco 1,995.45
Marco Inc 1,383.80
Mckesson Medical-Surgical 2,456.85
Menards - Buffalo 679.52
Mid-Minnesota Hot Mix Inc 108,174.94
Milana P Tolins LLC 100.00
Minn. Dept. of Human Services 560.73
Minnesota Monitoring 9,782.25
MN Assn.of Assessment Personnel 295.00
MN Counties Computer Coop. 6,250.00
MN County Attorneys Association 160.00
MN Dept. of Corrections 30,132.75
MN Dept. of Revenue 19,225.26
MN Onsite Wastewater Assn 125.00
MN Sheriffs Association 120.00
Morries Parts & Service Group 144.37
Multi Health Systems Inc 386.40
NEOGOV 11,473.00
NEOPOST Great Plains 309.00
Norment Security Group Inc 1,683.23
North Star Awards & Trophies 109.90
Office Depot 1,235.46
Office Of MN IT Services 131.25
Omann Brothers Inc 32,709.87
Otsego/City of 98,209.19
Pakor Inc 292.48
PSC Alliance Inc 5,273.65
Purick/Ryan 100.00
Quill Corporation 216.96
RCM Specialties Inc 2,321.00
Rockford Township 2,203.00
Rockford/City of 1,130.20
RS Eden 2,046.53
Save A Life 295.00
Schwans Home Service Inc 144.00
Select Account 1,507.60
Setter/Randi 300.00
SHI International Corp 3,742.70
Silver Creek Township 1,690.50
Sprint 4,711.50
St Michael/City of 2,608.00
State Supply Co 1,351.67
Stepp Mfg Company Inc 839.13
Stericycle Inc 316.29
Sterling Solutions Inc 500.00
Streichers 516.96
Suburban Tire Wholesale Inc 306.00
Thrifty White Pharmacy 2,540.94
Timekeeping Systems Inc 1,025.00
Total Printing 828.00
Varidesk 435.00
Verizon Wireless 331.68
Voss Lighting 119.80
Walmart Community RFCS LLC 147.55
Wright Hennepin Electric 2,482.59
Wright Soil & Water Cons Dist 120,361.00
Xcel Energy 832.93
19 Payments less than $100 1,075.90
Final total $766,592.71
The meeting adjourned at 10:10 a.m.
Published in the Herald Journal Aug. 17, 2015.