Wright County Board Minutes

BOARD OF WRIGHT COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
JANUARY 15, 2019
DATE APPROVED: JANUARY 22, 2019
COUNTY BOARD MINUTES 1-08-19
Husom moved to approve the minutes, seconded by Daleiden. The motion carried 5-0.
AGENDA
Lee Kelly, County Coordinator, referenced Consent Item F3, “Approve Signatures On Contracts For Fiscal Agent Services Provided By The Auditor/Treasurer’s Office.” He said that the Highway 55 Corridor Fiscal Agent Service Agreement should be removed and not included as part of approval of the Consent Agenda. The remaining six Fiscal Agent Agreements will be approved through approval of the Consent Agenda. Daleiden moved to approve the Agenda as amended. The motion was seconded by Potter and carried 5-0.
CONSENT AGENDA
Daleiden moved to approve the Consent Agenda as amended, with the removal of the Highway 55 Corridor Fiscal Agent Service Agreement. Husom seconded and the motion and it carried 5-0:
A. ADMINISTRATION
1. Authorize Attendance Of Commissioners, Minnesota Rural Counties Board Meeting ITV, 3-11-19, 9:30 AM - 2:00 PM, Wright County Government Center Rm 122 (Note that attendance will be after the Employee Recognition Ceremony scheduled for the same day at 10:00 AM.)
B. ADMINISTRATION
1. Authorize Attendance Of Commissioners, Quarterly Township Meetings:
A. 4-04-19 @ 7:30 PM, Albion Township
B. 7-10-19 @ 6:30 PM, Corinna Township
C. 10-03-19 @ 7:30 PM, Clearwater Township
C. ADMINISTRATION
1. Approve Memorandum Of Agreement Between Teamsters Local 320 (Sheriff Essential Supervisory Staff) & Wright County To Establish Terms & Conditions Of Employment For Matt Treichler As He Leaves His Position Of Lieutenant To Become The New Chief Deputy For The Wright County Sheriff’s Office
D. ADMINISTRATION
1. Madden, Galanter & Hansen, 11-2018 Services, $3,050.59
E. ATTORNEY
1. Authorize Litigation Against John 146, LLC, For Planning And Zoning Violations At 5813 Canterbury Avenue N.E., Buffalo Township, Minnesota
F. AUDITOR/TREASURER
1. Acknowledge Warrants Issued Between January 2, 2019 And January 8, 2019
2. Approve Temporary Liquor License For A.B.A.T.E. Of Minnesota, Inc. For Event On February 2, 2019
3. Approve Signatures On Contracts For Fiscal Agent Services Provided By The Auditor/Treasurer’s Office. **Note: The Highway 55 Corridor Fiscal Agent Services Contract Was Removed At The Request Of The County Coordinator And Was Not Included In Approval Of The Consent Agenda Item F3.
4. Acknowledge The 2019 Petty Cash And Change Fund Summary
G. HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES
1. Position Replacement
A. Financial Worker
H. HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES
1. Refer To The 1-23-19 Personnel Committee Meeting:
A. Interim Position Replacement:
1. Youth Services Supervisor
I. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
1. Refer to 1-23-19 Technology Committee:
A. Office 365 Update
B. ERP Update
C. Event Scheduler Project
D. Website Redesign
E. Project Portfolio
TIMED AGENDA ITEMS
SEAN DERINGER, SHERIFF
Introduce Two Recently Promoted Wright County Sheriff’s Office Sergeants
Sheriff Deringer introduced and commended recently promoted employees in the Sheriff’s Office:
Kevin Triplett, Patrol Sergeant
Ryan Ferguson, Criminal Investigation Lieutenant
Russ Erkins, Patrol Sergeant
Austin Linn was also introduced as the first Deputy sworn in by Sheriff Deringer since taking office.
BOB HIIVALA, AUDITOR/TREASURER
Approve Resolution: Findings of Fact & Order Regarding Redetermination Of Benefits For County Ditch No. 7 Pursuant To Minnesota Statute 103E.351; Approve Viewing Professional Services Contract For Redetermination of Benefits and Grass Strip Acquisition On County Ditch No. 7.
Greg Kryzer, Assistant County Attorney, said the Board is acting in their capacity as Drainage Authority. Upon review of records for County Ditch 7, the last time benefits were established was in 1905. The values and watershed have changed.
Borrell moved to adopt Resolution #19-06, adopting the Findings of Fact & Order regarding the redetermination of benefits for County Ditch 7 pursuant to MN Statute §103E.351. The motion was seconded by Daleiden. Estimated cost is $1,000. County Ditch 7 is located near Cokato. The motion carried 5-0 on a roll call vote.
On a motion by Daleiden, second by Borrell, all voted to approve the Viewing Professional Services Contract for Redetermination of Benefits and Grass Strip Acquisition on County Ditch No. 7.
Approve Resolution: Findings of Fact & Order Regarding Redetermination Of Benefits For Judicial Ditch No. 1 Pursuant To Minnesota Statute 103E.351; Approve Viewing Professional Services Contract For Redetermination of Benefits and Grass Strip Acquisition On Judicial Ditch No. 1.
Kryzer said the Board is acting in their capacity as Drainage Authority. Upon review of records for Judicial Ditch 1, the last time benefits were established was in 1910. The value and watershed have changed. The Ditch is in Marysville Township and bisects part of the County property where the gun range is located. There is a parcel that is not included on the benefit roles and the ditch bisects on two locations on that parcel. Estimated cost is $3,000.
Daleiden moved to adopt Resolution #19-07, adopting the Findings of Fact & Order regarding the redetermination of benefits for Judicial Ditch No. 1 pursuant to MN Statute §103E.351. The motion was seconded by Borrell. The motion carried 5-0 on a roll call vote.
On a motion by Daleiden, second by Borrell, all voted to approve the Viewing Professional Services Contract for Redetermination of Benefits and Grass Strip Acquisition on Judicial Ditch No. 1.
Adopt Resolution Of Findings And Order Regarding Reestablishment Of Records For County Ditch 31 Pursuant To Minnesota Statute 103E.101 subdivision
Kryzer said the Board held a public hearing on the correction of the drainage system record on 12-11-18 at 1:30 PM. Staff was then directed to draft findings and an order consistent with the proceedings, including responses to all comments received through the public comment process. Kryzer said all is in order to proceed.
Borrell moved to adopt Resolution #19-08, adopting the Findings of Fact & Order regarding the reestablishment of records for County Ditch 31 pursuant to MN Statute §103E.101. The motion was seconded by Daleiden and carried 5-0 on a roll call vote.
Accept The Invasive Plant Grant Assistance Fund Grant From The Minnesota Department of Agriculture For The 2019 Calendar Year
Matt Detjen, Ditch Coordinator, said the grant is due on 1-18-19. Funding can be used for noxious weed control.
Daleiden moved to approve the grant. The motion was seconded by Husom and carried 5-0.
Approve Preliminary December Revenue/Expenditure Budget Report.
Tammi Vaith, Chief Deputy Auditor/Treasurer, said the preliminary budget report will be posted on the website. Once finalized, the website will be updated. Potter requested a breakout of the Local Option Sales Tax in future reports.
Potter moved to approve the preliminary December Revenue/Expenditure Budget Report. The motion was seconded by Husom and carried 5-0.
VIRGIL HAWKINS, HIGHWAY ENGINEER
Set Transportation Committee Of The Whole Meeting (TCOTW) To Discuss Transportation Items
On a motion by Potter, second by Husom, all voted to schedule a TCOTW Meeting on 2-19-19 at 1:00 PM with the following agenda items:
1. Briarwood Avenue Traffic Study (County Parks Department & City of Monticello)
2. LRTP (Long Range Transportation Plan) presentation/preview & next steps
3. I94 Project updates (Albertville to St. Michael & Clearwater to Monticello)
4. 2019 Projects update (potential CSAH 30 Delano project?)
5. Local Option Sales Tax
Authorize Highway Engineer Hawkins And Assistant Highway Engineer Hausmann To Attend The NACE (National Association Of County Engineers) Annual Meeting/Management & Technical Conference In Wichita, KS On April 14-18, 2019
Husom moved to authorize Hawkins and Hausmann to attend the NACE Annual Meeting/Management & Technical Conference in Wichita, KS, April 14-18, 2019. The motion was seconded by Potter and carried 5-0.
MARC MATTICE, PARKS & RECREATION DIRECTOR
Authorize Signatures On A Contract For Deed Between Wright County, John Paul Eddy and Elizabeth Ann Eddy
Mattice said this was discussed at the 7-09-18 Committee Of The Whole Meeting, and the Parks & Recreation Department was directed to proceed with drafting documents, survey, legal description, contract development, and purchase. Payments in the Parks & Recreation Capital Improvement Plan are as follows:
2019 - $34,333.33
2020 - $34,333.33
2021 - $34,333.34
Potter moved to authorize signatures on the Contract For Deed between Wright County, John Paul Eddy, and Elizabeth Ann Eddy. The motion was seconded by Daleiden and carried 5-0.
Adopt A Resolution Related To A Grant Application Through The Minnesota Department OF Natural Resources Federal Recreational Trail Program For The Construction Of Approximately 4.5 Miles of Natural Surface Hiking/Cross Country Ski Trails At Bertram Chain Of Lakes Regional Park
The grant is due the end of February 2019 and if awarded, will be available for the project in 2020. Estimated project cost is $250,000. The local match is detailed in the Parks & Recreation Department Capital Improvement Plan for Fiscal Year 2020.
Daleiden moved to adopt Resolution #19-09, for the Grant Application through the MN Department of Natural Resources Federal Recreational Trail Program for the construction of approximately 4.5 miles of natural surface hiking/cross country ski trails at Bertram Chain of Lake Regional Park. The motion was seconded by Potter and carried 5-0 on a roll call vote.
GREG KRYZER, ASSISTANT COUNTY ATTORNEY
Adopt Resolutions Abolishing Office of County Coordinator, Establishing Office of County Administrator, And Appointing Lee Kelly As County Administrator
Kryzer said the Board previously directed the Attorney’s Office to draft the resolutions to switch to an administrator style of County governance. Three draft resolutions were presented. The first would abolish the Office of the County Coordinator at 11:59:59 P.M. on 1-15-19. The second would establish the Office of County Administrator at 12:00:00 A.M. on 1-16-19. The third appoints Lee R. Kelly to the Office of County Administrator and authorizes the County Board Chair to sign an employment agreement.
Daleiden moved to adopt Resolution #19-10, abolishing the Office of County Coordinator at 11:59:59 P.M. on 1-15-19. The motion was seconded by Husom. Borrell asked Vetsch whether his concerns have been addressed. Vetsch said he met with Kelly and worked out a methodology to make sure the board is involved in the decision-making process. The move to Administrator would allow Kelly to manage staff on behalf of the Board. Husom does not feel the position will change significantly with the change to Administrator. She feels it will streamline operations. The Board still has oversight on what happens in the County. The Board will still provide direction to Kelly, and this will remove some of the extra steps. Vetsch said the Board has not changed policies, personnel items, or procurement to allow Kelly to make more decisions. The change relates more to the structure of placing him above the department heads on the organizational chart. Borrell said he understands all of this but wants to be involved. He said the natural gravitation to Administrator would be to accumulate more power. This may not happen tomorrow, but it could in the future. Borrell conveyed to Kelly that by voting in favor, he is showing admiration and commitment to Kelly on a personal level. Borrell hopes future Administrators in this position will have a similar personality to Kelly and not seek the power. Potter said whether the position is Coordinator or Administrator, there is still the burden on the Commissioners to be involved with constituents. With the Administrator position, there is a clear chain of command on implementation of policies. The motion carried 5-0 on a roll call vote.
Daleiden moved to adopt Resolution #19-11, establishing the Office of County Administrator at 12:00:00 A.M. on 1-16-19. The motion was seconded by Potter and carried 5-0 on a roll call vote.
Husom moved to adopt Resolution #19-12 appointing Lee R. Kelly to the Office of County Administrator, effective 1-16-19 at 12:00 A.M. The motion was seconded by Daleiden. Kryzer said the resolution includes the Employment Agreement with Lee R. Kelly as Exhibit 1. The motion carried 5-0 on a roll call vote.
ITEMS FOR CONSIDERATION
1-04-19 COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE MINUTES
Potter moved to approve the 1-04-19 COTW Minutes, seconded by Husom. Husom made the following correction to the minutes: Page 3, 7th paragraph, 2nd sentence should read, “Commissioner Christine Husom said the final numbers for the building projects won’t be known until bids are received.” Potter and Husom accepted this change to the motion. Borrell said he will vote against the first recommendation, which is to proceed with the Design Development phase of the proposed Government Center with the relocation of Administration to Level 3. He said it is time for him to express opposition to the proposed Government Center. He supports the other recommendation related to the Sheriff’s Office Range Project/Tactical Training Center. It was the consensus that the recommendations from the Committee Meeting would be voted upon separately.
Husom and Potter accepted an amendment to the motion to include approval of the Item A recommendation from the 1-04-19 COTW Minutes only: “Proceed with the Design Development phase of the proposed Government Center with the relocation of Administration to Level 3.” The motion does not include approval of the COTW Minutes as originally stated. The motion carried 3-2 with Daleiden and Borrell casting the nay votes.
On a motion by Potter, second by Borrell, all voted to approve the 1-04-19 COTW Minutes, to include approval of Item B, “Proceed with the Design Development phase of the Sheriff’s Office Range Project / Tactical Training Center, including adding a second floor, a mechanical penthouse, and an indoor range”; and Item C, “Schedule Committee Of The Whole meetings for the above two projects on 1-24-19 and 2-25-19, both at 10:00 A.M.”
The 1-04-19 COTW Minutes follow:
I. Discuss Bonding Options For Proposed New Government Center And Sheriff’s Office Range Project
The following documents were distributed at the meeting:
1. Bruce Kimmel, Senior Municipal Advisor/Director, Ehlers, presented
A. “June 2019: Wright County Issues 20-Year Wrapped Bonds to Fund $60M for Government Center;”
B. “County Issues 25-Year Wrapped Bonds,” and
C. “County Issues 25-Year Level Bonds.”
2. Bob Hiivala, Auditor / Treasurer, distributed two documents:
A. “Year/Assumption, 2019-2024;” and
B. “Wright County Budget Forecasting Workshop”
Bruce Schwartzman, Architect/Partner, BKV Group (BKV), said the County Board requested cost, debt, and repayment information regarding the proposed new Government Center (new GC) and the Sheriff’s Office Range Project/Tactical Training Center (Tactical Training Center) at the 12-20-18 Committee Of The Whole meeting. The estimated cost of the proposed new GC was $50 million. The option of moving the Administration Department to Level 3 next to the Information Technology Department would add $1.1 million. Other options discussed included exterior parking. Schwartzman said he and his colleagues will proceed with design changes to relocate Administration to Level 3, add exterior enclosed parking with secure gates which increases the cost by approximately $250,000, and add the underground parking option as an alternate bid at a cost of about $1.7 million for 32 stalls. The County Board can decide whether to include underground parking after bids are received. If the Level 3 expansion and exterior parking were added, the total cost of the building will increase to about $53 million.
Schwartzman said the Tactical Training Center is a bare bones project. After the $2.2 million contribution from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the base cost for the County’s portion would be about $3.8 million. This amount could be added to the $53 million for the new GC building. Schwartzman said it was decided after a previous discussion to add a second floor and an indoor lane. That brought the building estimate to approximately $5 million. The total budget for these two projects including additions is about $58 million. Lee Kelly, County Coordinator, said he and Bob Hiivala, Auditor/Treasurer, met in December and decided to start with an analysis of a $60 million bond. He asked Ehlers to provide several bonding proposals, including wrapping existing debt with both 20-year and 25-year repayment terms. Hiivala distributed the five-year budget forecast documents (see attachments 2A and 2B).
Bruce Kimmel, Senior Municipal Advisor/Director, Ehlers, said they ran three scenarios to provide flexibility for the County (see Attachments 1A, B, and C). He said it is important to consider this bond issue in the context of the County’s current debt burdens. All three scenarios assume the County will issue bonds in June of 2019 and assume 18 months of interest-only payments. These payments are not capitalized as part of the bond issue. The variation between the scenarios starts in the year 2021.
Kimmel addressed the 20-year wrapped bond scenario. To keep this payment structure relatively level and get the debt paid off in twenty years, he had to backload more into the bonds. This scenario includes the 2012, 2015, 2016, and 2017 bonds issued previously, and the 2018 bonds issued most recently for the new Justice Center (noted by the purple bar on the chart). The cumulative debt burden for the County currently is $8 million per year. Adding a bond issue for the new GC and the Tactical Training Center (noted by the maroon bar on the chart) brings the annual debt payment to $10.2 to $10.4 million over twenty years. Lower interest rates and construction costs might bring the annual debt payment closer to the $10 million mark. The benefit of a 20-year bond is that the County would pay less in interest, or $36,269,883 over the full term as scheduled.
Kimmel said with this scenario the County would pay off very little principal due to wrapping prior bonds. However, he felt confident the bond issue could be restructured and sold with a call date of 2030. At that point, the County could possibly refinance if rates were better, or stretch out the bond for a longer time, if desired.
Kimmel said the 20-year scenario appears to be a pretty good solution for the County. The one caveat is that debt requirements do not drop off, which means no capacity is built up as old bonds fall off. That does not have to be a negative, if the expectation is that the County will continue to grow in the future. However, debt service would be set at $10.3 million per year for the next twenty years. The average estimated interest rate for this bond issue is 3.5 percent. That is the current market rate for AA+ rated counties like Wright. Kimmel said bond rates have stabilized. Not many bonds are being issued, and demand is high. He said the County will have a robust marketplace for this bond. Kelly said investors may very well pay a premium for the bond in this case. Kimmel agreed, and said they could expect $63 million to $65 million bids for a $60 million issue. They would resize the bond to net whatever proceeds were needed based on the project bids.
Kimmel said the second scenario involves a 25-year wrap of existing 2017 bonds that fall off in 2030. The purpose of stretching the bond out five more years was to free up capacity over time to accommodate any future projects. The drawback is the significant increase in interest cost. With this scenario, the County would get increased annual affordability and capacity to take on new projects and debt service, but the cost is another $8.5 million of interest expense or $44,767,184. This is due to the longer term and a slightly higher average interest rate of 3.7 percent. There could be a call date after ten years, and a second call date would be possible for the last six to seven years of the bond issue.
Kimmel said the third scenario is a 25-year bond with level payments over the entire term. There would be no wrap. This approach has steps that free up capacity. The interest expense is about $2 million less than the 20-year wrap at $34,310,660. The catch is that the County would pay roughly $11.9 million annually in the first ten years compared to $10.4 million to $10.5 million with the other two scenarios. The higher debt payment may push it out of the realm of affordability for the first ten years. Paying off principal faster comes at a cost. The interest rate would be closer to 3.5 percent because this scenario involves faster principal reduction. Kimmel said the County has flexibility to mix and match the three scenarios and consider other options.
Hiivala referenced his handouts regarding the five-year forecast based on assumptions such as investment earnings, the correlation between operating grants and expenses, personnel costs, and tax capacity. Hiivala said those assumptions were used to build a financial model to construct a forecast of the levy over the next five years. He said based on these assumptions, next year’s levy could be less than a ten percent increase. Another objective was to maintain a stable tax rate.
Vetsch said Options A and C make the most sense. A 25-year plan offers flexibility with call dates. The only problem with Option C is that the County would have to levy another approximately $1 million in 2021 in debt service that is not structured. There is already money saved to make debt payments for Option A provided the Sheriff’s Office surrenders $450,000 in Capital Improvement Plan dollars for the next ten years to be committed to the Tactical Training Center. Sheriff-Elect Sean Deringer said that is a given.
Kimmel said Option C pays more principal earlier, so the interest rate is lower. Options A and B pay off principal later at somewhat higher interest rates. Commissioner Mark Daleiden asked how much the payment drops for every million dollars less on the bond issue. Kimmel said on the 20th year option it would be about $50,000 per year less.
Commissioner Charles Borrell said this is the most debt the County has undertaken. The scenarios are based on growth. If inflation occurs in two years, the County wins. If deflation occurs, it could be worse. He does not want any debt. He favored putting the project off. There are too many unknown factors to go forward now.
Vetsch said the funds are already available for Option A. The County has all the funds needed without levying any additional dollars in the future. With Option C, the County has all the money needed until 2022. For the next six years after that, the County would need another $300,000 to $400,000 per year to meet the bond payment, or $1.8 million to $2.2 million. After that, the bond payment would drop to $7.9 million. With this option, Vetsch said the County would be saving about $2 million in interest.
Kimmel said reserves could be used to pay off existing debt and to manage the debt levy. The 2012 bonds are callable at the end of 2020, amounting to about $500,000. On December 1, 2020, Hiivala could pay an additional $500,000 and save the County $20,000 in interest expense. With the 2015 – 2017 bonds, the County could pay off all or some of the outstanding bonds and save additional interest. In any given year, the County could also buy down debt.
Vetsch said if the building is delayed, the County would need to earn more than 8.5 percent interest on its investments. Construction costs will increase by five percent annually, and there is a 3.5 percent interest rate on the bond payment. If the County can’t achieve those returns via its investments, it makes more sense to build the building. He feels building now is better use of taxpayer dollars. Discussion continued regarding the benefits and drawbacks of Options A and C, whether to issue one large bond or several smaller ones, and whether to pay for the Tactical Training Center out of reserves.
Daleiden favored Option C, as did Vetsch. Commissioner Christine Husom said the final numbers for the building projects won’t be known until bids are received. Borrell favored paying for the Tactical Training Center out of reserves. Wilczek said the numbers will tighten as the project goes through the Design Development phase.
Schwartzman said the goal is to present the final Design Development package and refined numbers to the County at the end of February. The Tactical Training Center is set for completion in summer of 2020, while the new GC would be completed late in 2020.
Recommendation: Authorize the following:
a. Proceed with the Design Development phase of the proposed Government Center with the relocation of Administration to Level 3;
b. Proceed with the Design Development phase of the Sheriff’s Office Range Project / Tactical Training Center, including adding a second floor, a mechanical penthouse, and an indoor range;
c. Schedule Committee Of The Whole meetings for the above two projects on 1-24-19 and 2-25-19, both at 10:00 A.M.
Minutes submitted by Deb Schreiner, Administrative Specialist.
(End of 1-16-19 COTW Minutes)
Additional Discussion on the Design Development of the Proposed New Government Center
Vetsch asked for continued discussion on the topic of the new Government Center, since the motion passed 3-2. He said the Board voted unanimously to approve $1.6 million to take them this far in the process. He wanted Daleiden and Borrell to explain their opposition and why they don’t find value in what has been spent thus far.
Daleiden responded that he did not say he was not finding value. His vote was to disagree that now is the correct time to do this. He suggested mothballing the project for 1-2 years. He is very concerned about another market correction and with the size of this project. He feels the County can survive for a while status quo. Vetsch asked whether he means pulling the plug and not expending any more time on development. Daleiden said there are three votes in support. Until that changes, he does not see that any other discussion is necessary.
Potter said history has shown that waiting to proceed with the Jail project came at a price tag of $55 million to taxpayers. The construction climate is favorable and was during the construction of the Justice Center and Highway buildings. Bonding rates are still favorable. As far as the market correction, his understanding is that may be more like 2022. Potter feels moving forward is a more prudent and respectful way for Wright County citizens.
Husom said the Board agreed to proceed through the Design Development phases. She does not think they should cease at the final design phase and does not see the advantage. The final cost is unknown at this time, but BKV has indicated they can stop the process at any time. She supports moving forward because of the time, effort and money spent thus far. She also stated this is a favorable time for bonding.
Vetsch asked that those in opposition bring forth an alternative plan including what will be done with allocated funds. Borrell said he does not want to install a new boiler at the current Government Center location; if it breaks it can be replaced at that time. Borrell wants to keep the Health & Human Services (HHS) building open. When the new Justice Center opens, that will free up space in the current Court Administration location at the Government Center. That space can be remodeled inexpensively on a temporary basis. He disagrees with Daleiden in waiting 1-2 years on the project. He would like the current locations utilized for 15-20 years. Husom responded that is not a temporary fix and would involve major remodeling.
Potter referenced the construction cost index and associated costs with past decisions to wait on construction. He said the HHS building is at the end of its life expectancy and any amount of money expended in the next 5-10 years will exceed its value. Daleiden agreed but said the problem lies in doing many projects in a 1-2 year time frame. They can continue to plan. Borrell suggested putting funding aside toward capital improvements. Husom said the problem is that construction costs continue to rise. That is why when the Law Enforcement Center was opened in 2009, the County was did not build the Justice Center as costs had risen so dramatically. Vetsch stated it is not favorable to proceed on a 3-2 vote. He also questioned the costs associated with delay and said bond and construction rates are good at this time. Husom said the County has gotten to this point in the design phase and may as well finish it. Delay of the project would be another discussion. Vetsch said commissioners should advocate for what they believe in, and he values his fellow commissioners’ ideas. The consensus was that discussion on this topic could occur at another time.
SCHEDULE COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE MEETINGS RE: DESIGN DEVELOPMENT FOR NEW GOVERNMENT CENTER AND SHERIFF’S OFFICE RANGE PROJECT
Suggested date: January 24, 2019 at 10:00 A.M. in Community Room 120
Husom moved to schedule a COTW Meeting on 1-24-19 at 10:00 A.M., seconded by Borrell. The motion carried 5-0
Suggested date: February 25, 2019 at 10:00 A.M. in Community Room 120.
On a motion by Husom, second by Potter, all voted to schedule a COTW Meeting on 2-25-19 at 10:00 A.M.
JUSTICE CENTER FURNITURE FIXTURE AND EQUIPMENT (FF&E)
Kelly said as they move forward with the construction of the Justice Center, there is not a contract included with Design Services. Due to the size of the project, it is suggested to do so. Currently one proposal has been received for the design of FF&E. It will include unique seating surfaces and workspaces within courtrooms. The project carries $2.2 million in FF&E costs. The consensus was for Kelly to obtain additional proposals with a COTW Meeting to follow.
IT DIRECTOR RECRUITMENT - DISCUSSION TO REFER TO 1-15-19 COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE MEETING AT 1:00 PM
On a motion by Daleiden, second by Potter, all voted to refer the IT Director Recruitment to the 1-15-19 COTW Meeting. Vetsch noted that notice was posted last week.
ADVISORY COMMITTEE / ADVISORY BOARD UPDATES
1. I-94 Coalition. Potter attended a meeting where items discussed included freight programs, legislative sessions and priorities, and the Transportation Alliance Day at the Capitol scheduled for 2-07-19. An open house will be held in Monticello on 1-16-19 for discussion on the noise walls at Fallon Avenue.
2. SWCD. Borrell attended a meeting on 1-14-19 where grants were approved for Howard Lake and Waverly projects.
3. Safe Communities of Wright County. Husom attended a meeting on 1-11-19. Items discussed include Parent/Teen Driver Education, Wright Road Classes, a reduction in EMS calls, mock crashes, and the child car seat program.
4. Jim Shovelain recognition. Board members recognized and thanked Jim Shovelain for his service on the Great River Regional Library Board. Shovelain served for 8.5 years and has reached the end of his term.
5. ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning). Daleiden said six ERP bids were received and meetings are scheduled this week to narrow down to two firms. Bid amounts vary greatly.
6. Parks Commission. Daleiden said disc golf will be available at Montissippi Park in Monticello sometime this summer. An emerald ash bore management application will be used in County parks.
The meeting adjourned at 10:23 A.M.
County Board Minutes Submitted by: Susan Backes, Clerk to the County Board
Published in the Herald Journal Feb. 1, 2019.