Wright County Board Minutes

BOARD MINUTES BOARD OF WRIGHTCOUNTY COMMISSIONERSJune 22, 2021DATE APPROVED: July 6, 2021
The Wright County Board met in regular session at 9:00 A.M. with Husom, Vetsch, Daleiden, Wetter, and Kaczmarek present.
COUNTY BOARD MINUTES 6-15-21 MEETING
Husom moved to approve the minutes from 6-15-21. The motion was seconded by Vetsch and carried 5-0.
AGENDA
Wetter requested to add Item B, (Wright County Historical Society), and Daleiden requested to add Item C, (Wright County Community Action), to Items for Consideration.
Vetsch moved to approve the Agenda with the two additions, Items B and C. The motion was seconded by Kaczmarek and carried 5-0.
CONSENT AGENDA
Wetter requested to pull Item A1 (Administration – Finance) for discussion and clarification.
Wetter moved to approve the Consent Agenda with the removal of Items A1 (Administration – Finance). The motion was seconded by Kaczmarek and carried 5-0.
* Items A1 for discussion.
A. ADMINISTRATION – FINANCE
1. *Authorization for the following budget amendments due to the receipt of several grants in 2021, due to COVID-19. Budget amendments for Small Business Grant Funds, as follows:
01-099-484-5327 $2,733,983.57
01-099-484-6261 $23,974
01-099-484-6814 $2,703,345
01-099-484-6859 $250
01-099-484-6910 $6,414.57
American Rescue Plan Act, as follows:
01-099-493.5449 $13,439,055
2. Approve budget amendment and transfer of $306,867 from General Fund to the Capital Improvement Plan Fund (CIP) for the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) licenses
01-100-000-0000-6910 Transfer Out $306,867
34-170-000-0000-5910 Transfer In $306,867
3. Acknowledge Warrants issued between June 9, 2021 and June 15, 2021 (See below, Item X. Warrant Listings)
4. Approve a temporary Liquor License for the Clearwater American Legion Post 323 for an event on July 17, 2021. Contingent upon Clearwater Town Board approval
5. Approve transfer of $64,161 from Project Text Message Retention (8202) to Unallocated (8000). This project is now closed
34-170-000-8000-6600 CIP Budget Unallocated $64,161.00
34-170-100-8202-6600 CIP Budget Text Message Retention -$64,161.00
6. Review monthly finance report for May 2021 (See below, Item IX. Monthly Finance Report – May)
B. HIGHWAY
1. Approve date & time for receiving bids for the Monticello Township Fallon Avenue State Park Road Account (SPRA) Project, SAP 086-600-008
2. Approve the disposition of a rubber – tire roller from the Highway Department to the County Fair Board. The Highway Department will be selling two 13-wheel rubber – tired rollers (packers) due to the purchase of two new rollers
C. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
1. Position replacement: IT Business Analyst
2. Position replacement: IT Senior Technical Support Specialist
3. Refer to the 6/23/21 Technology Committee:
A. Project Updates
1. CAMA
2. Admin – Event scheduler
3. Admin – Government Center
4. SQL Server 2014 replacement
5. ERP
6. Website redesign
7. HHS EDMS Collections
B. Solution Architect Updates
1. ECM
C. New Project Requests
1. Emergency Notification System – Everbridge to Rave
2. Recorder Key Management System
3. Court Services limited Zoom utilization – Fast Track
4. Convert workflows from Nintex to MS Power Automate
5. P & Z Board meeting minutes – Voice to Text
6. Election Learning Management
7. Admin – Smartsheet Application
D. 2021 Project summary
E. CIP Technology Planning
F. PPM Solution – Update
ITEMS PULLED FROM CONSENT AGENDA TO BE DISCUSSED
A. ADMINISTRATION – FINANCE
Wetter requested further clarification regarding Small Business Grant Funds. She wanted to know if the funds are dedicated to specific types of small businesses, how the amounts were determined, and how the funds will be awarded.
Assistant Finance Director Heather Lemieux explained that this item is a budget adjustment for the grants received in January 2021. The grants were unforeseen and therefore not budgeted. With the approval of the budget adjustments, monthly reports will reflect the actual activity. These funds have already been awarded and disbursed.
Wetter moved to approve Item A1 under the Consent Agenda. The motion was seconded by Husom and carried 5-0.
TIMED AGENDA ITEMS
ADMINISTRATION, LEE KELLY
Introduction of Assistant County Administrator Holly Wilson
County Administrator Lee Kelly introduced the new Assistant County Administrator Holly Wilson. Wilson comes from Mille Lacs County where she served as the Assistant County Administrator.
Wilson held several positions while working at Mille Lacs County. She served as the Personnel Director, Public Works Director, County Engineer and most recently the Assistant County Administrator. Prior to Mille Lacs County, Wilson worked for Public Works in the City of Willmar and was the City Administrator for Pine City.
ADMINISTRATION – FINANCE, RYAN KOTILA
Approve Resolution Accepting Performance Measurement Grant Application
Kotila said last year the board approved a resolution accepting a Performance Measurement Grant and asked the board to approve the same resolution for 2021. With the grant approval the county will receive approximately 14 cents per capita. Last year, the county received about $19,394 for this grant.
The first year the Performance Measurement Grant was accepted, the county adopted the measures. With the approval of the measures, it was then submitted to the Office of State Auditors (OSA). The funds will be received in December 2021. This grant does not require local matching funds.
Vetsch moved to accept the Performance Measurement Grant Application. The motion was seconded by Husom and carried 5-0 on a roll call vote.
HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT, VIRGIL HAWKINS
Approve Agreement No. 21-53 with the City of Saint Michael for the construction and maintenance of a mini – roundabout at the intersection of County Road 119 and Jansen Avenue
Hawkins said this agreement is to help accommodate a new housing development in Saint Michael.
Husom moved to approve Agreement No. 21-53 with the City of Saint Michael for construction and maintenance of a mini – roundabout at the intersection of County Road 119 and Jansen Avenue. The motion was seconded by Wetter and carried 5-0.
ITEMS FOR CONSIDERATION
COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE MEETING MINUTES 6-15-21
Husom moved to accept the Committee of the Whole meeting minutes and recommendations from 6-15-21. The motion was seconded by Vetsch and carried 5-0.
I. County Assessing and Local Appraisers
IT Director Matthew Fomby provided the guidance and standards IT recommends for using a government workstation:
• Device should be placed in a public know location – ex. St. Michael, MN Government Center
• Device should be place behind two physical barriers (ex. IT server room or the mail room)
• Restricted access to the specific location
• Cameras are not required to be in the same room as the device; but a minimum of 2 cameras from two different perspective should be face the room in which the device is located
• Devices should be chained lock to the specific location
• The specific location should meet “normal” temperature to avoid overheating and vice versa
• All ports on the computer will be disabled other than the mouse and keyboard ports
• Only access Wright County network via VPN
• User must have Multi-factor Authentication (MFA)
• Workstation should a static internet protocol (IP) – for monitoring and auditing
• Workstation IP should be hidden
• Workstation installed with end-point protection and web filtering
• User Permission: Only read or hidden all non-personal file; read and write personal files, etc.
• User should not have permission to download and execute application
• User should shut down device after using device
County Administrator Lee Kelly stated the group should discuss IT security considerations, the current process, the future process, and any financial impacts. Commissioner Kaczmarek questioned municipalities and townships’ ability to choose between local assessors and county assessors each year. Assistant County Attorney Brian Asleson stated the power lies with the County Board. The County Board, by resolution, can decide that all assessments will be completed by the county assessor. If pursued, the language would not take effect immediately but rather the second assessment that takes place after adoption of a resolution. There are exceptions in the statute for larger cities. Municipalities with a population over 30,000 can have their own assessors regardless.
Commissioner Daleiden stated the County is currently providing the computers for contract workers to utilize. Fomby said Wright County computers operate on the Wright County VPN system, Microsoft Windows licenses are provided, and anti-virus protection.
Daleiden stated some of the independent appraisers work in their homes and may not be able to meet all of the IT requirements. Fomby said the County needs to ensure that the information is protected, that the person accessing the information is the person you’re saying is accessing the information, and physical security is maintained. Any government building will meet the physical security requirements. Commissioner Vetsch questioned the need for a minimum of two cameras from different perspectives facing the room in which the device is located. He stated we have allowed Wright County employees to work remote without having two cameras. Fomby stated County employees are covered under a policy and their access can be terminated immediately if they are working in a location they should not be. IT has the ability to only allow access to the network from a specified location. The standards IT is expecting are federal standards used across all organizations.
St. Michael City Administrator Steve Bot stated the city has no issue with physical security within a government building. He only asked that Wright County employees are asked to follow the same standards as his employees.
Daleiden questioned if there is a way to have the VPN open during a limited timeframe, making it more secure. Fomby stated the County does not have the manpower to continually monitor the network, like large organizations do. It may be possible to turn the VPN on and off; it is something he would investigate.
Tou Pha stated the biggest challenge lies with the Internet Service Provider (ISP). ISP’s have a limited number of IP addresses available, therefore several individuals are assigned the same IP address. Fomby will be investigating if IT can limit one person’s access without a large expense. Static IP addresses cost additional money.
Tom Praska detailed security already in place by listing the steps he must take to gain access to his computer. He must use his cell phone to verify he is the one accessing information. He stated he must connect to internet at his house and cannot gain access at a public location. Additionally, Praska has four separate passwords to access the information he needs. He questioned if Assessors are the only group losing current access. He stated he works many nights and weekends and expressed concerns with not having the ability to enter data from his home. He also stated he has not been given access to County email and he must use his personal email; Adding he would pay the yearly amount for County email access himself. Praska also stated he cannot print anything from his computer.
Private Assessor Cheryl Foster stated she does not want County email on her computer for security reasons.
Ken Yager stated he is close to retirement and has been asked what the County’s view is toward local assessors. The advantage of being a local assessor is that you can do things on your own time.
Wright County Assessor Tony Rasmuson said his department handles all the mailings and notifications internally. The entire county consists of approximately 70,000 properties and Wright County assess approximately 19,000 of them. Rasmuson stated he thinks we need to find a solution so local assessors are not burdened by the proposed standards. He suggested implementing it over time.
Commissioner Kaczmarek stated the County pays for the license requirements for employees and the private assessors are responsible for paying for licenses on their own. He requested an approximate cost if the County were to handle all assessments. Vetsch stated the County would need to hire five additional assessors and would see an increase of approximately $200,000 per year. Kelly stated there are many scenarios, such as phasing it in over several years.
Rasmuson said a five-year plan could be developed or the County could acquire districts over time as individuals retire. Districts would have to pay additional per parcel to attract an assessor. Vetsch stated it becomes more difficult for private assessors to be profitable.
Corinna Township Supervisor Chuck Carlson stated he is hopeful all sides can work together to make something work.
Daleiden questioned if the township association has insurance that will cover cyber security. Carlson stated he did not know but would find out.
Vetsch asked what cities and townships plan is long-term; are they going to keep local assessors, or will they rely on the County? Carlson stated the kind of experience needed cannot be learned in six months. Kaczmarek stated he spoke to Fomby, Rasmuson, four independent assessors, cities and townships, and citizens. Overall, those that have had county assessors for a long time have been satisfied. Those with independent assessors are very satisfied and would like to keep them, if possible. The price range from independent assessors is $11-$14 per parcel. The security concerns raised were internal to Wright County. The response from the public was “big government wanting to get bigger”.
Vetsch stated there is more demand for independent assessors while only a limited number of assessors are available. Daleiden stated of the 15 largest counties in the state, six of them have local assessors. Some of the local assessment is done by municipalities.
Kaczmarek stated the new Computer Assisted Mass Appraisal (CAMA) system will be installed soon. All assessors will need training and he feels a portion of the expense should be passed on to the municipalities.
Daleiden stated the county wants to make things work for the independents but also want to make sure the County is protected.
Fomby stated he is working on a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with the City of St. Michael. Once signed, IT would physically check the location and complete the checklist. He recommended each city or township work with the County individually to develop a MOA. Daleiden suggested passing some of the costs on.
RECOMMENDATION: Develop and have Memorandum of Agreements in place with all parties by September 30, 2021.
COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE MEETING MINUTES 6-16-21
Vetsch wanted to clarify that a consultant would only be used in the capacity of a grant researcher. Kaczmarek confirmed that if a consultant is hired, the American Rescue Plan will cover the cost. Kelly said a public health survey also needs to be added to the recommendation.
Wetter moved to accept the County Board Workshop Meeting minutes and recommendations from 6-16-21. The motion was seconded by Vetsch and carried 5-0.
I. Continuation of American Rescue Plan Discussion
Project Administrator Elizabeth Karels gave the board a 38-page document. The first few pages provided an overview from the previous Committee of the Whole meeting last Tuesday, June 8, 2021, which Karels went over with the board.
County guidelines were added in the document, which included the temporary nature of ARP-SLFRF funds, hiring employees, supplanting, and supplementing existing programs, 2020 revenue loss, and subrecipient relationships. The document also included a proposed process to follow for the American Rescue Plan.
The rest of the document includes program suggestions that have been brought to the committee. The highlighted proposed programs are the ones that could possibly be included in “phase one”. Phase one is the first group of projects that could move forward.
Vetsch said the “internal county expenses” proposed programs are clean and clear. The external proposed programs have conceptual pieces, but the actual grant application would need to be seen for the board to review the project activities and outcomes before a claim is submitted. He said there should be one more step in the process or approving uses of funds. He suggested that any external proposal needs to have a detailed proposal for the funds, not just a general idea.
Karels clarified that a step will be added between number six and seven, which will bring the grant agreement back to the Board for review and approval. An annual review check will be built-in, which will need to show the program is working the way the agreement states.
The grant agreements will be written for a one-year period. Programs will have to provide the data after one year, and if the data doesn’t show that the program is performing, the grants could be denied for the next year.
Karels suggested hiring a consultant to help navigate other funding available under the American Rescue Plan. That way if there are questions on a program proposal, the consultant could look it over and tell us where it would fit or where else it could be funded from. This would help ensure that the county wouldn’t miss out on the possibility of other grant funds.
Vetsch clarified that step ten will be added, to the process for approving uses of funds, regarding renewals.
Karels reminded the board that the ARP-SLFRF funds cannot be used for programs that have already been budgeted for. The funds cannot be used to supplement existing programs unless there is detailed data showing how the pandemic has expanded the use of the program.
Assistant Finance Director Heather Lemieux said it could be helpful to get some community input to help prioritize the programs to help find out the want and the need.
The committee discussed adding board members to the staff American Rescue Plan (ARP) Committee. After much discussion it was decided if the committee received a questionable grant application the process would be to contact one of the Commissioners for guidance as needed, rather than adding them to the review committee.
The committee reviewed the different programs that could be added to phase one.
Karels and Goodrum Schwartz will provide more detailed descriptions of external and internal – HHS programs that will be included in phase one to the board on July 6, 2021.
RECOMMENDATION:
Karels will add a step between six and seven to bring the grant applications back to the Board for review and approval. Step 10 will be added to the process of approving uses of funds, regarding renewals. Karels will also look for a consultant to help navigate other funding available. Goodrum Schwartz will create a public health survey which will help the committee figure out where the needs are in the community.
Move forward with phase one external projects:
• Technology Support and Training for Seniors through Senior Community Services,
• Economic Assistance for Wright County 4H through Wright County 4H,
• Volunteer Recruitment for Safe Families through Wright County HHS,
• Expand Emergency Assistance through Wright County HHS.
Move forward with phase one internal items:
• Public Health Community Health Needs Assessment,
• Pandemic Unknowns, PPE and other Supplies,
• Payroll for Public Health Employees,
• Administration Time through Wright County.
Schedule Committee of the Whole for 1:00 p.m. July 6, 2021.
WRIGHT COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY
Wetter informed the board that Welker School, which is located on the Wright County Fairgrounds, is in need of a new roof.
Facilities Director Alan Wilczek said the Wright County Historical Society in Buffalo is structurally maintained by the county. Kelly said the county does own the fairgrounds site. However, traditionally if the Fair Board is making improvements that exceed $10,000 it is brought to the County Board.
Kaczmarek said he discussed the proposal and arrangements with the President of the Fair Board. The President of the Fair Board said this building is one of a few buildings in which the owner is responsible for maintenance and repairs.
Wright County Historical Society Manager Sally Stevens said the current shingles on the Welker School building are asphalt. She agreed that the county owns the land, and the Historical Society owns the building. The Welker School building is only used during the fair. She said there is gray area regarding this building and the land use, and it would be beneficial to clarify who oversees the space and where the responsibility lies.
Kaczmarek asked if the building will be used during this year’s county fair because it’s quickly approaching. Stevens said the roof won’t be fixed before then, but the building will still be used.
Husom suggested developing a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU); if the Fair Board is using the building for its own purposes, the liability would essentially be on the Fair Board.
Assistant County Attorney Greg Kryzer suggested referring this item to a committee. The committee can look at the lease and agreements to have a better understanding to help move the repairs forward. Daleiden and Kelly suggested sending this item to the Ways & Means Committee in July.
Vetsch moved to send the Historical Society and the Fairground agreement and all other information to the Ways & Means Committee at the next meeting in July. The motion was seconded by Kaczmarek and carried 5-0.
WRIGHT COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION (WCCA)
Daleiden and the WCCA toured the old jail and found equipment that could be used to help the community. He forwarded pictures of kitchen items that WCCA is interested in using along with a letter, to the other commissioners. The equipment is from the old jail and would be used for Food Rescue in Wright County. The equipment has been sitting unused in the old jail since 2009. WCCA will remove the equipment it is interested in.
Daleiden said while on the tour of the jail he saw file cabinets and chairs being stored in the kitchen and suggested it would be a good idea to start sending the items to auction or offering it to the 4-H Club and other organizations in the county.
Husom agreed that it would be better to start liquidating items rather than waiting until the last minute. However, she wants to make sure it is disbursed fairly. Daleiden said the items can be donated to WCCA and other organizations but it must be nonprofit organizations or would benefit the county. Kelly said by Minnesota Statute §375.18, General Powers of the County Board, with a subdivision directly related to Community Action Agencies and the disposition of equipment from a county to a Community Action Agency, if the dollar amount is relatively low the county can donate equipment per the statute. Daleiden said Auction Masters sells kitchen equipment and the items are selling for low prices.
Wilczek said after reviewing the items, the only refrigeration unit WCCA is interested in is a plug-in freezer, a range top oven and the rest of the equipment is mainly stainless-steel tables, shelving and racks. He said there are a few different options for disposing of items stored in the old jail, but some of the file cabinets will be used for storage in the new buildings.
Kaczmarek asked if WCCA has a location already designated for the list of items. Daleiden said they do have a location and are looking at a second location. Kaczmarek said the stainless-steel equipment was originally paid for by the taxpayers and he thinks the county should have someone without a vested interest do a walk through and establish a value for the equipment that WCCA is interested in.
Husom said this is a group that can utilize this equipment and has been making meals for seniors since COVID-19 started and it’s a value to the community. Daleiden added that it’s not just seniors but anyone who needs it, so in the end the taxpayers are benefiting from it.
Vetsch moved to donate the kitchen equipment to WCCA for its usage. The motion was seconded by Husom and carried 4-1 with Kaczmarek voting against it.
ADVISORY COMMITTEE/ADVISORY BOARD UPDATES
Association of Minnesota Counties (AMC) District 5. Kelly and Husom attended the AMC District 5 meeting on June 14, 2021. Executive Director Julie Ring emailed the Commissioners regarding the Strategic Planning efforts for the District. Kelly said the board needs to submit its input to Ring and AMC regarding the strategic plan and moving forward. The American Rescue Plan (ARP) was discussed and the other counties at the meeting are in a similar situation to Wright County as far as developing their plans.
Minnesota Counties Intergovernmental Trust (MCIT) will be sending a dividend again this year, in the amount of $12 million, split among member counties. Rates will most likely be going up slightly for the 2022 budget. Husom added that a representative from MCIT stated regarding claims, the most expensive part of the body is the shoulder. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) claims with law enforcement are up this year. A resolution was handed out that AMC would like to get to the Governor recognizing the commitment and dedication of public service county staff during COVID-19, by proclaiming a day to honor them.
Central Mississippi River Regional Planning Partnership (CMRP). Kelly met with CMRP to discuss future action items regarding Framework 2030 and staffing among the group. Vetsch said there was discussion regarding how to facilitate the work plan because the organization does not have a lot of staff. However, the organization has enough funds to hire a contractor for six to 12 months to get projects moving forward.
Trailblazer Transit. Kelly attended the Trailblazer Board meeting on June 17, 2021 prior to the celebration of the completed expansion of the facility. Trailblazer adjusted the drivers’ wages by $2.50 per hour and adjusted the salaried employees by 2 percent, along with adopting the staffing plan and organizational chart for 2022.
Administration. Administrative Intern, Ellie Lechner, was hired and started, June 22, 2021. She will be assisting administration with various projects, with a focus on the American Rescue Plan.
University of Minnesota Extension. Wetter attended the meeting with Extension. There is a proposal to share an Extension Educator with Meeker and McLeod counties. There has been work on the budget and the next meeting will be Thursday, June 24, 2021.
North Fork Crow River One Watershed One Plan. Wetter attended the Policy Committee meeting. The committee went over the bylaws and eliminated the $50,000 project cap.
Wright County Community Action (WCCA) Wetter said Head Start received two grants totaling $72,000 for summer preschool working with children that are four and five years old that have never attended kindergarten. There were also grants to help provide produce, pantry items and prepared meals for seniors and low-income households.
Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD). Wetter attended the meeting on June 14, 2021 and discussed the Mississippi Saint Cloud One Watershed One Plan and the South Fork Crow River One Watershed One Plan. Applications have been submitted for grant money. SWCD will find out by August if a grant will be received.
Historical Society. Wetter said the Historical Society is fully open again and is looking for a shed or garage that could be donated to store items.
Mayor’s Association. Vetsch attended the Mayor’s Association dinner at Big Boar in Hanover.
Wright County Economic Development Partnership (EDP). Vetsch attended the EDP, which rolled out its new website. The Economic Development Authority (EDA) is trying to optimize the website.
TIMED AGENDA ITEMS (CONT.)
YEARS OF RECOGNITION
The County Commissioners and County Administrator recognized the employees that have been employed by Wright County for five, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, and 40 years. Each employee received a certificate and mug. Employees celebrating 15 or more years of service also received a gift card.
ADVISORY COMMITTEE/ADVISORY BOARD UPDATES (CONT.)
Mentorship Education and Drug Awareness (MEADA) Coalition. Husom said a gift of $5,000 was given to MEADA from the County Attorney’s Office from drug forfeiture money. MEADA approved a $500 grant for the Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) program.
Drug-Free Communities Grant Coordinator Lori Blaukat is working on a pilot prevention program with Monticello School District to create a comprehensive evidence-based pilot program. MEADA will be involved with the Street Party of Hope in September to raise money for cancer care. It was student Kaitlyn Main’s last meeting with MEADA and they welcomed student Zack Pribyl from Maple Lake High School.
Workforce Center. Husom said the Workforce Center is monitoring closely to see if the County goes into shutdown. The workforce center is opposed to new legislation of the dislocated worker program cuts. The workforce center is possibly going to be doing updates to the Workforce Innovation Opportunities Act.
The Turn. Husom said The Turn will be having another graduation ceremony at 1:30 p.m. Thursday, June 24, 2021 in Sturges Park for Benton Sothman. There will be a keynote speaker Connie Kotz followed by a reception which the public is invited to.
Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS). Husom along with Senator Bruce Anderson and members of the SWCD visited the University of Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center. The research center has been doing research on Zebra Mussels, using low doses of copper to try to eliminate them along with doing genetic targeting. The research center is also doing research on carp which produce high amounts of phosphorous and make great fertilizer.
Lake Associations. Kaczmarek attended the Lake Ann and French Lake Association meetings. At the meeting, ditches were discussed.
Planning Commission. Kaczmarek attended the Planning Commission meeting which was four hours long. There were 11 items discussed, most of which were resolved, and some will be revisited at a future meeting.
Fair Board. Kaczmarek said the Fair Board is planning to hold the Wright County Fair as scheduled. The board feels all COVID-19 restrictions can be met. There will be fireworks on Saturday, July 24, and free entertainment every day. The schedule for the fair is on the county website.
Broadband Committee. Daleiden said a company, Design Nine, has been hired to give an overview of the county’s possibilities and issues with broadband. The company said when they have worked with other counties the pricing has went down for residents. The company will help with a feasibility study and possible grant opportunities.
Wellness Committee. Daleiden said the Wellness Committee has been working with Parks and Recreation to try and get employees to utilize the parks for exercise.
The meeting adjourned at 10:39 a.m.
County Board Minutes submitted by Angie Fisher, Administrative Specialist
Published in the Herald Journal, July 16, 2021.
WARRANTS FOR PUBLICATIONWarrants Approved On 6/09/2021For Payment 6/09/2021
ALADTEC INC 19,214.00
AMERICAN TOWER CORPORATION 7,621.04
BOARMAN KROOS VOGEL GROUP INC 8,041.68
GRANITE ELECTRONICS 4,363.88
GUARDIAN FLEET SAFETY LLC 5,206.88
MINNESOTA RECOVERY CONNECTION 3,649.29
PRAIRIE LAKES YOUTH PROGRAMS 2,816.00
SUNSET LAW ENFORCEMENT LLC 12,920.00
28 Payments less than 2000 12,127.59
Final Total: 75,960.36
Warrants Approved On 6/10/2021For Payment 6/10/2021
ANNANDALE/CITY OF 2,425.80
HARRIS COMPUTER SYSTEMS 15,050.00
HEALTH PARTNERS 851,644.90
HEALTH PARTNERS - DENTAL 25,402.58
INSIGHT PUBLIC SECTOR INC 253,764.61
MN COUNTIES COMPUTER COOPERATIVE 65,406.77
MN DEPARTMENT OF LABOR & INDUSTRY 2,352.49
MOTOROLA SOLUTIONS INC 20,292.26
TYLER TECHNOLOGIES INC 18,409.00
WRIGHT CO SNOWMOBILE TRAIL ASN 4,147.94
22 Payments less than 2000 11,027.39
Final Total: 1,269,923.74
Warrants Approved On 6/11/2021For Payment 6/11/2021
4IMPRINT, INC 4,768.27
AAA STRIPING SERVICE INC 310,386.60
AVENU INSIGHTS & ANALYTICS LLC 3,420.00
CANON FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC 2,689.21
CENTRAL MN COUNCIL ON AGING INC 6,587.00
INTERPROSE CORPORATION/THE 2,657.79
MEEKER WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL INC 2,362.48
TRUENORTH STEEL 5,976.64
35 Payments less than 2000 13,524.58
Final Total: 352,372.57
Warrants Approved On 6/14/2021For Payment 6/14/2021
BANKWEST 4,342.50
CENTURYLINK 2,576.18
I & S GROUP INC 18,058.75
MN NATIVE LANDSCAPES 19,630.69
MSB EXCAVATING & TILING LLC 14,800.00
SHORT ELLIOT HENDRICKSON, INC. 3,792.58
THOMSON REUTERS WEST PUBLISHING CORP 2,008.89
VALUATION GROUP/THE 10,000.00
VERIZON WIRELESS SERVICES LLC 5,154.37
WOOD CHUCKERS FIREWOOD 2,007.50
44 Payments less than 2000 12,108.00
Final Total: 94,479.46
Warrants Approved On 6/15/2021For Payment 6/15/2021
ABM BUILDING VALUE 52,118.33
ANOKA COUNTY 116,385.50
AT&T MOBILITY 6,876.59
BAKER TILLY VIRCHOW KRAUSE LLP 3,500.00
BLACKSTONE CONTRACTORS LLC 68,968.14
BUFFALO/CITY OF 93,314.67
FLAHERTY & HOOD P.A. 3,541.50
MARCO 4,272.13
MARTIN-MCALLISTER CONSULTING 2,200.00
MODERN MOLDING INC 14,725.13
NEOGOV 9,920.77
OMANN CONTRACTING COMPANIES INC 8,200.00
WM CORPORATE SERVICES, INC. 3,141.08
49 Payments less than 2000 17,643.04
Final Total: 404,806.88
Warrants Approved On 6/15/2021For Payment 6/15/2021
ABM BUILDING VALUE 52,118.33
ANOKA COUNTY 116,385.50
AT&T MOBILITY 6,876.59
BAKER TILLY VIRCHOW KRAUSE LLP 3,500.00
BLACKSTONE CONTRACTORS LLC 68,968.14
BUFFALO/CITY OF 93,314.67
FLAHERTY & HOOD P.A. 3,541.50
MARCO 4,272.13
MARTIN-MCALLISTER CONSULTING 2,200.00
MODERN MOLDING INC 14,725.13
NEOGOV 9,920.77
OMANN CONTRACTING COMPANIES INC 8,200.00
WM CORPORATE SERVICES, INC . 3,141.08
49 Payments less than 2000 17,643.04
Final Total: 404,806.88
Published in the Herald Journal, July 16, 2021.